The IHR Blog |

New reviews: John Wyclif, Medieval space, Cypriot communists and labour and liberalism

by

1280px-Wycliffecollege_toronto_chapel1We start this week with John Wyclif on War and Peace by Rory Cox. Christopher Allmand and the reviewer discuss a work which places Wyclif in a long historical context (no. 1725, with response here).

Then we turn to Space in the Medieval West: Places, Territories, and Imagined Geographies, edited by Meredith Cohen and Fanny Madeline. Sarah Ann Milne recommends a book which serves to substantiate and complement existing studies whilst offering a number of fascinating new explorations (no. 1724).

Next up is Yiannakis Kolokasidis’s History of the Communist Party in Cyprus: Colonialism, Class and the Cypriot Left, which Alexios Alecou finds to be an original contribution, rich with theoretical insights and practical implications (no. 1723).

Finally we turn to Labour and the Caucus: Working-Class Radicalism and Organised Liberalism in England, 1868-1888 by James Owen. Jules Gehrke believes this book is sure to become a valued part of the scholarly conversation (no. 1722).

New Historical Research article online

by

policeLocal initiative, central oversight, provincial perspective: governing police forces in nineteenth-century Leeds by David Churchill

This article examines police administration as a branch of urban government, based on a case study of Leeds between 1815 and 1900. Making extensive use of local government and police records, it takes a longer-term view of ‘reform’ than most existing studies, and privileges the more routine aspects of everyday governance. It thus provides an original exploration of central-local government relations, as well as conflict and negotiation between distinct bodies of self-government within the locality. Previous studies have rightly emphasized that urban police governance was primarily a local responsibility, yet this article also stresses the influence of central state oversight and an extra-local, provincial perspective, both of which modified the grip of localism on nineteenth-century government.

New reviews: Eurasian Borderlands, peace, early American wars, Reformation

by

eurasia-map-oldWe start with The Struggle for the Eurasian Borderlands: From the Rise of Early Modern Empires to the End of the First World War by Alfred Rieber. Simone Pelizza and the author discuss a book which is destined to be an indispensable reference work for both students and researchers for many years to come (no. 1721, with response here).

Next up is William Mulligan’s The Great War for Peace. Cyril Pearce reviews a significant, if flawed, contribution to the debate about the impact of the First World War (no. 1720).

Then we have the Encyclopedia of the Wars of the Early American Republic, 1783-1812: A Political, Social, and Military History, edited by Spencer C. Tucker, which Jonathan Chandler believes this encyclopedia will be a welcome addition to the shelves of any library (no. 1719).

Finally we turn to Reformation Unbound: Protestant Visions of Reform in England, 1525–1590 by Karl Gunther. Donald McKim finds this to be a splendid study which clearly delineates the various Protestant visions of reform in England (no. 1718).

Hakluyt Society Publications now on open access.

by

The library would just like to inform its readers that the Hakluyt Society Publications are now once more available on open access and can be found on the second floor of the IHR library in the north-east corner of the main reading room beside the Dutch collection.

Juan Luis Vives and Thomas More: Humanism and Anglo-Spanish Cultural Relations in the Sixteenth Century

by

Vives & MoroThe lives and interactions between Juan Luis Vives and Thomas More

Friday 13th February 2015, 10.00 am – 6.00 pm
Wolfson Conference Suite, Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, London

Registration is open for this day conference, supported by the Spanish Embassy in London.  The conference coincides with a major exhibition in Valencia on the lives and the interactions between two central figures in English and Spanish life in the early sixteenth century, the humanists Sir Thomas More and Juan Luis Vives.

More was successively a lawyer, MP, councillor to Henry VIII, and Lord Chancellor whose opposition to the English Reformation led to his execution for treason. Vives, born in Valencia into a Jewish  family which had suffered at the hands of the Inquisition, came to  England in the 1520s to be tutor to Princess Mary (later Queen Mary  Tudor), and resided for some time in Oxford. He wrote extensively on psychology, medicine and education. The two men shared opinions, outlooks and approaches and Vives spent time at More’s home in Chelsea in 1526. This conference will examine their friendship and collaboration in the wider context of sixteenth-century humanism and Anglo-Spanish relations.

Speakers for the event include:

Prof. Eamon Duffy, Magdalene College, Cambridge
Prof. Glyn Redworth, University of Oxford
Prof. Rosa Vidal Doval, Queen Mary University, London
Prof. Bethany Aram, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Seville
Professor Enrique Garcia Hernan, Institute of History, Spanish National Research Council
Prof. Igor Pérez Tostado, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Seville

Registration:

Full Fee: £20
Student: £10

Registrations for the conference can be made online or by requesting a registration form from the Events office. The Registration fee will include attendance, tea/coffee and lunch.

Latest issue of Historical Research – Feb 2015 (vol. 88, no. 239)

by

promenading2Articles

Intelligence and intrigue in the March of Wales: noblewomen and the fall of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, 1274–82. Emma Cavell

Famine is not the problem: a historical perspective. Cormac Ó Gráda

False traitors or worthy knights? Treason and rebellion against Edward II in the Scalacronica and the Anglo-Norman prose Brut chronicles. Andy King

Radical Geneva? The publication of Knox’s First Blast of the Trumpet and Goodman’s How Superior Powers Oght to be Obeyd in context. Charlotte Panofre

The rise of the promeneur: walking the city in eighteenth-century Paris. Laurent Turcot

Black people and the criminal justice system: prejudice and practice in later eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century London. Peter King and John Carter Wood

Moral economies and the cold chain. Susanne Freidberg

Eugenics, socialism and artificial insemination: the public career of Herbert Brewer. David Redvaldsen

Can we conquer unemployment? The Liberal party, public works and the 1931 political crisis. Peter Sloman

Notes and Documents

Lord Burghley’s ‘Ten precepts’ for his son, Robert Cecil: a new date and interpretation. Fred B. Tromly

New reviews: Lincoln and Latin America, English clergy, Louis XIV and the Indian Army

by

lincolndouglasWe start this week with Slavery, Race and Conquest in the Tropics : Lincoln, Douglas, and the Future of Latin America by Robert E. May. Phillip Magness and the author debate a book which gives us a Civil War that was both the product of international affairs, and a shaping force on their subsequent course (no. 1717, with response here).

Then we turn to Hugh M. Thomas’s The Secular Clergy in England, 1066-1216, and Katherine Harvey and the author discuss a book which is surely destined to become one of the definitive works in the field for many years to come (no. 1716, with response here).

Next up is Status Interaction During the Reign of Louis XIV by Giora Sternberg. Linda Kiernan believes this book presents historians of the court with a vigorous model to test (no. 1715).

Finally we have George Morton-Jack’s The Indian Army on the Western Front: India’s Expeditionary Force to France and Belgium in the First World War. Adam Prime finds this to be an extremely stimulating book, which should appeal to academics and enthusiasts alike (no. 1714).

Latest from Research Training – January 2015

by

Anna-Davin

Dr Anna Davin

As memories of Christmas fade and you are left wondering how to fill the dark nights, there could not be a better time to distract yourself from the winter and to sharpen up your historical skills with the IHR’s exciting programme of research training!

Starting very soon is An Introduction to Oral History, the IHR’s long-running and very popular guide to undertaking historical research by interview. Taught in ten weekly sessions by Dr Anna Davin from the History Workshop, this is a comprehensive outline of how to set about oral history research for those just starting out: it covers both the nuts and bolts of recording methods and more complex questions of ethics, questionnaire composition and how to get the most from respondents. We only have a few places left, so do please hurry with your application.

For historians who want to use non-textual material but don’t know where to begin, our revised and re-vamped Visual Sources for Historians course is the answer. Each week for five weeks we shall explore a different theme:  Local/Global; Visualising Britain and the Sea; Material Culture and the Spatial Turn; Historical Subjects; and History and the Media. The full-day sessions will consist of lectures, discussions and visits to museums, galleries and archives such as the Royal Institute of British Architects, the Royal Geographical Society, the Royal Museums, Greenwich and the National Portrait Gallery. Students will learn the questions to ask and the ways to interrogate visual culture in art, cartoons, film and architecture to bring them to bear upon historical analysis.

For those, on the other hand, who want to use the internet as a historical research tool, the one-day Internet for Historical Research workshop will provide you with all the knowledge and skills you require. Covering all aspects of deploying the net as a research tool, and including abundant advice on search strategies, this course will show how to find and use the abundance of primary and secondary source material now available online, as well as teaching how to use the net as a way to promote and archive your own work.

Lastly, starting in March as the weather warms up and hopeful thoughts of spring start to blossom, what could be more appropriate than the IHR’s course Historic Gardens: Research in Action? This is the perfect introduction to how to use archival research in restoring, conserving and managing historic gardens. Taught in eight weekly sessions, the course will be based on a mixture of classroom study and site visits, introducing students to the rich resources for the study of garden history in and around London and serving as an excellent taster for the IHR’s MA in Garden and Landscape History.

Full details of courses and instructions on how to apply can be found at: http://www.history.ac.uk/research-training.

New reviews: London women, Tokyo Zoo, Callaghan Government, Mystic Ark

by

williamsFirst up is Women, Work and Sociability in Early Modern London by Tim Reinke-Williams. Hannah Hogan and the author discuss an inspiring starting-point for further, in-depth histories of women, work and sociability in early modern England (no. 1713, with response here).

Then we turn to Ian Jared Miller’s The Nature of the Beasts: Empire and Exhibition at the Tokyo Imperial Zoo, which Jonathan Saha recommends as being important beyond its obvious and substantial contribution to both Japanese history and zoo history (no. 1712).

Next up is Crisis? What Crisis? The Callaghan Government and the British ‘Winter of Discontent’ by John Shepherd. Ian Cawood reviews a concisely written, forensic political analysis of the defining historical myth by which all British political parties still live (no. 1711).

Finally we have The Mystic Ark: Hugh of Saint Victor, Art, and Thought in the Twelfth Century by Conrad Rudolph, which Karl Kinsella believes to be a thoroughly worked out and thoughtful piece of scholarship (no. 1710).

 

Welcome to PORT

by

This post has kindly been written for us by Dr Matthew Phillpott, SAS-Space Manager and SAS Digital Project Officer.

PORT01For those of you who have been using the Institute of Historical Research’s online research training platform, History SPOT you will have noticed a variety of changes recently. The sites web address has changed, its name has changed, and its design has changed.

The refit of History SPOT and its transformation into PORT (Postgraduate Online Research Training) is an exciting development. We believed that the old site was beginning to look tired but yet its contents still remain useful and relevant and there is still so much scope for expansion.

In addition the opportunity arose to merge the IHR’s efforts with the wider efforts of the School of Advanced Study (of which the IHR is one component). History SPOT has therefore become PORT, an online research training platform not just for historians, but for all humanities studies.

This is a good thing for historians. The extent of training provision on PORT will rapidly expand over the next few years and a vast amount of it will be relevant to students studying history.  Already, PORT provides additional resources offering advice about completing a PhD and a host of handbooks providing links to modern languages resources. Soon a resource will be launched providing introductory guidance to research using quantitative methods, various videos covering all kinds of research needs, and more ‘history’ focused courses, such as managing your data as an historian.

So please do check out PORT and let us know what you think.

http://port.sas.ac.uk

[Note: Those familiar with History SPOT will see that not all of the old resources are currently online. These just require a quick fix to work with the new design and will be reappearing over the coming weeks]

 

< Older Posts

Newer Posts >