The IHR Blog |

Author Archives: gemmadormer


Future Past: researching archives in the digital age

by

Thursday 18 May 2017, Wolfson Conference Suite, IHR

The IHR and British Records Association (BRA) invite you to attend this one day conference on Thursday 18 May 2017.

This conference aims to promote the understanding and collaboration between archivists and researchers; explore challenges posed by digital access to collections, and improve methodologies (e.g. education/training for researchers in what information is available from online catalogues, how archivists can improve catalogue descriptions so researchers can find relevant records more easily and how you can understand the context of records showing up in searches).

Speakers include:

  • Nick Barrett (Univ of Nottingham)
  • Geoff Browell (Kings College London)
  • Maria Castrillo (Senate House Library)
  • Kathleen Chater
  • Sophie Clapp (Boots)
  • Clare Cowling (IALS)
  • Jo Pugh (TNA & University of York)
  • Tom Scott ( Wellcome Collection)
  • Tamara Thornhill (TFL)
  • Jane Winters (SAS)

For a workshop provisional programme, please click here.

Fees apply

  • Full rate: £35
  • Concession rate: £25 (Student/retired/IHR Friend/BRA member)

Fees include refreshments and lunch

Please follow and like us:

Inaugural George Weidenfeld Lecture in Jewish History 2017

by

lionel_de_rothschild_hoc

 

Towards a History of Jewish Emancipation Politics

16 March 2017, Beveridge Hall, Senate House
18:00-20:30

Speaker: Professor David Sorkin (Yale University)

In this lecture, David Sorkin, Professor of Jewish History at Yale University, will examine the involvement of Jewish communal and religious leaders in the processes of Jewish emancipation in Europe from the early modern period onwards. In questioning whether historians have developed effective explanations and categories to explain Jewish political participation he will propose a new analysis of Jewish politics from the 16th to the 20th centuries.

Attendance at this lecture is free, but advanced registration is required

Lecture: 18:00
Reception: 19:30

Book online now


 

Please follow and like us:

The Gerald Aylmer Seminar 2017

by

img_9562

The Gerald Aylmer Seminar 2017
Strongroom to Seminar: archives and teaching in higher education

24 February 2017, Wolfson Conference Suite, IHR
09:00-17:00

The Gerald Aylmer Seminar 2017 will consider the role of archives in higher education teaching. It will focus on the critical questions which surround how academics and archivists can build on a strong tradition of collaboration to engage in creative and innovative pedagogical practice. Just as teaching methods have evolved within higher education, so have the expectations of the modern student. In a digital world, the experience of how a new generation of researchers interact with archival resources has changed dramatically. What then is the role of document based teaching in this shifting landscape? How can technology be used to enhance the learning experience? What other insights does teaching with archival material in higher education bring?

Following the keynote by Professor Jo Fox, the seminar will offer three themed sessions in which speakers will address issues from multiple archival and scholarly perspectives. Session one ‘creator as teacher’ focuses on an established collaboration between archivists and academics based on the works of John Ruskin, who left his extensive collection with the specific aim of it being used as a resource for educating future generations. Other speakers will reflect on their innovative teaching practices involving archival material, including the use of digital collections and data sets, and the ways archivists can take an increasingly active role in shaping students’ engagement with archival collections.

A provisional programme is available to view online here

The seminar is free and open to all, but advanced registration is required. Register online now

All lunch and refreshments will be provided.

Please follow and like us:

London’s women historians: a celebration and a conversation

by

online-image-events27Dame Lillian Penson & R.W. Greave’s Seminar in 1956-7: Dame Lillian is seated at the end of the table

London’s women historians: a celebration and a conversation

On Monday 13 March 2017 in collaboration with King’s College London, the IHR will be celebrating London’s women historians.

At the start of 2017, gender equality remains one of the most pressing issues in the historical profession. This is evident from research published by the Royal Historical Society in 2015, longstanding efforts by the Economic History Society to elevate women in their discipline, and an initiative at the University of Oxford to launch a ‘manifesto’ for Women in the Humanities. This event is an attempt to continue and deepen this conversation, thinking especially about how twentieth-century London institutions have both enabled and constrained female achievements in history. It will also be an opportunity to celebrate the accomplishments of women doing history in the past, inaugurating a pop-up exhibition of twentieth-century London women historians at the IHR, organised by King’s College London. We will ultimately aim to discuss how to ensure issues of gender equality and the contribution of women to the discipline remain at the fore of history in London via the IHR, as Britain’s ‘national’ centre for history.

Confirmed speakers: Caroline Barron, John Beckett, Laura Carter, Linda Clark, Amy Erickson, Margot Finn, Jo Fox, Laura Gowing, Alana Harris, Peter Mandler, Jinty Nelson, Lyndal Roper & Pat Thane.

This event is free and open to all, but advanced registration is required.
All refreshments will be provided

Register online now

 

1977

Staff and students of the Department of History, King’s College London, 1977
This image was provided by Laura Carter– lecturer in Modern British History at KCL

Please follow and like us:

Holocaust Memorial Lecture 2017

by

image

Holocaust Memorial Lecture 2017

1 February 2017, Wolfson Conference Suite, IHR
6.30-8.00pm

An intimate view of evil? How German Jews made sense of Nazi perpetrators

Professor Mark Roseman, Indiana University Bloomington

Holocaust Memorial Day Event – Institute of Historical Research in collaboration with the Research Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism.

After years of focusing on policy and perpetrators, historians of the Holocaust have begun to give victims’ experience more attention. But we have been surprisingly slow to ask how victims viewed the perpetrators. Jews from Germany were in some ways best placed to understand the Nazis – they shared the same language and national background after all, and had anxiously observed them evolve. At the same time, they, more than any other victims, were forced to confront painful questions about how the culture in which they had taken such pride had produced the barbarians who now confronted them. How did they make sense of the “perpetrators from next door”?

Mark Roseman is a historian of modern Europe, with particular interests in the History of the Holocaust and in modern German history. Current research projects include a critical synthesis of recent work on Nazi perpetrators, and a project looking at a life-reform and resistance group in Germany 1920-2000.

The lecture is free and open to all and advanced registration is required. Register online now 

Please follow and like us:

IHR Winter Conference 2017: Civil Wars

by

9th_new_york_infantry_regiment_charging_the_confederate_right_at_antietam_army-mil-2008-09-10-145623

IHR Winter Conference 2017: Civil Wars


20 January 2017, Wolfson Conference Suite, IHR

The Syrian Civil War is now in its 6th year. It prompts a consideration of the nature of civil wars in general and the term ‘civil war’ itself. Is it a helpful label when considering events as different as the English and French Revolutions (both of which have been called civil wars), the American Civil War of the 1860s, the Russian Civil War after the 1917 Revolution, and the events in Spain in the 1930s? Do Civil Wars share certain features or is this a term of art that obscures the uniqueness of each separate historical situation? This conference will question the conceptualisation and language of civil discord.

Speakers include:

  • Professor Salwa Ismail (SOAS)
  • Professor David Parrott (University of Oxford)
  • Professor Alan Forrest (University of York)
  • Dr Adam Smith (UCL)
  • Professor Orlando Figes (Birkbeck College)
  • Professor Paul Preston (LSE)

For the preliminary conference programme, please click here.

Full fee: £35

Student/unwaged/retired/ IHR Friend: £25

(Includes all refreshment breaks and lunches)

Register online now

The Winter Conference 2017 will be proceeded by the IHR Historical Research Plenary Lecture (sponsored by Wiley) on the 19 January 2017 at 6pm in the Wolfson Conference Suite. Professor John Morrill (University of Cambridge) will give a talk on The English Revolution as a Civil War.  This event is free to attend but registration is required. Register online now here.

Please follow and like us:

IHR Winter Conference 2017: Civil Wars

by

9th_new_york_infantry_regiment_charging_the_confederate_right_at_antietam_army-mil-2008-09-10-145623

IHR Winter Conference 2017: Civil Wars

The Syrian Civil War is now in its 6th year. It prompts a consideration of the nature of civil wars in general and the term ‘civil war’ itself. Is it a helpful label when considering events as different as the English and French Revolutions (both of which have been called civil wars), the American Civil War of the 1860s, the Russian Civil War after the 1917 Revolution, and the events in Spain in the 1930s? Do Civil Wars share certain features or is this a term of art that obscures the uniqueness of each separate historical situation? This conference will question the conceptualisation and language of civil discord.

Speakers include:

  • Professor Salwa Ismail (SOAS)
  • Professor David Parrott (University of Oxford)
  • Professor Alan Forrest (University of York)
  • Dr. Adam Smith (UCL)
  • Professor Orlando Figes (Birkbeck College)
  • Professor Paul Preston (LSE)

Registration: £35/£20 (concessions) and includes all refreshment breaks and lunches)

For a provisional programme and information on how to register, please visit the conference website


 IHR Wiley Lecture 2017: The English Revolution as a Civil War
19 January 2017 (18:00-19:30)

Professor John Morrill (University of Cambridge)

Register here

 Tweet #IHRWIN17 @ihr_events

Please follow and like us:

Inaugural Kehoe Lecture in Irish History

by

Birth_of_the_Irish_Republic

 

Inaugural Kehoe Lecture in Irish History 2016

“Never so simple and clear again”: Memory, Disillusionment and the Aftermath of the Irish Revolution.

Speaker: Professor Roy Foster (University of Oxford)

The IHR invites you to join us in Beveridge Hall on Tuesday 15 November 2016, for the Inaugural Kehoe Lecture in Irish History 2016 by Professor Roy Foster.

The lecture is free to attend, but advanced regisration is required. Register now

Lecture: 6.00-7.30pm
Reception: 7.30-8.30pm


Professor Roy Foster is Carroll Professor of Irish History at the University of Oxford and the author of many books on modern Irish history and culture, including Modern Ireland 1600-1972 (1989), Paddy and Mr Punch (1993), The Irish Story: telling tales and making it up in Ireland (2001), Luck and the Irish: a brief history of change, 1970-2000 (2007) and the two-volume biography of W.B.Yeats, The Apprentice Mage, 1865-1914 (1997) and The Arch Poet, 1915-1939 (2003) and Words Alone: Yeats and his Inheritances (2011), based on his 2009 Clark Lectures at Cambridge, which deals with a number of Irish writers of the nineteenth century, including Sheridan LeFanu and Bram Stoker. His most recent book is Vivid Faces: the revolutionary generation in Ireland 1890-1923 (2014).
Please follow and like us:

History Now & Then 2016/17

by

shutterstock_263368988

The IHR History Now & Then Series returns for 2016/17

Wolfson Room I | IHR | Senate House | Malet Street | WC1E 7HU

Discussion: 18:00-19:30
Refreshments: 19:30-20:30

This series of public lectures at the IHR takes off from an extraordinary (and potentially dangerous) paradox.  On the one hand, ‘history’ seems to be more popular than ever:  in schools and universities, on film, TV and the internet, in sales of historical biographies, visitor numbers to heritage sites, the growth of family history, re-enactment societies and the like.

Yet we also live in an aggressively here-and-now culture in which many people seem to lack any real understanding of how the present is linked to all that has preceded it.   Thus, major current issues are frequently discussed with little sense of their longer-term historical roots: migration policy, for example, or continued British membership of the EU or Russian involvement in Ukraine.  As Jo Guldi and David Armitage argued in their ‘History Manifesto’(published in 2014), it is vital to understand the past if we are to have any chance of planning sensibly for the future.

 

Welcome: Professor Lawrence Goldman, Director of the Institute of Historical Research
Chair: Daniel Snowman, Senior Research Fellow, Institute of Historical Research


 5 October 2016Rhodes statue and Beyond

How far can/should history be re-written in accordance with current values?  History and the pros and cons of ‘apology’.  Are there things about the past that it is not acceptable to mention (or research)?
Panel: Martin Daunton, Margot Finn, Jinty Nelson & David Starkey

 

2 November 2016: History and Change

Is history necessarily the story of ‘change’?  Who/what makes things change? The role of ‘Great men/women’ – and other factors?
Panel: Margaret MacMillan, Rana Mitter, Andrew Roberts & Gareth Stedman Jones

 

7 December 2016: The Focus of History

Much history is national history.  But should ‘history’ focus on the nation?  Or the locality – or maybe the wider world?  Or on ‘things’?  And should it have a short, precisely defined temporal focus – or a longer durée?
Panel: Maxine Berg, Jerry Brotton, Richard Drayton & Chris Wickham

 

11 January 2017: Lessons from the Past

Does history ‘repeat itself’?  What kind of ‘lessons’ can we learn from history?  ‘Counterfactual’ history: could the past have been different?
Panel: Jeremy Black, Taylor Downing, Ian Mortimer & Lucy Riall

 

8 February 2017: History and Religion(s)

What role has religion played in the unfolding of history?  Has it  provided a fundamental motivating force?  Or has religion primarily reflected deeper socioeconomic trends and priorities?
Panel: Felicity Heal, Diarmaid MacCulloch, Miri Rubin & Brian Young

 

8 March 2017: The Future of the Past

How will future historians judge today’s historiography?  What do we over-emphasise (or under-emphasise)?  ‘Big’ History, ‘big’ data: how is ‘history’ changing in the digital age?
Panel: Caroline Barron, Anne Curry, Charlotte Roueché & Jane Winters


Advanced registration for this seminar series is required.
Tickets are £5 per session or £25 for all 6 sessions.
Free for the Friends of the IHR.

To register visit the University of London online store.
For more information about the series please visit the History Now and Then website.

For any queries, please contact the IHR Events Office: IHR.Events@sas.ac.uk

Please follow and like us:

Professor Sir David Cannadine on Prime Ministers’ Props

by

Prime Ministers' Props TX Card

Professor Sir David Cannadine explores political fame and image by looking at how an object or prop, whether chosen deliberately or otherwise, can come to define a political leader.

Listen to Prime Ministers’ Props

Please follow and like us: