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Publications


New reviews: Inter-war health, global history, Parisian smiles and US anti-communism

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kchFirst up is The Politics of Hospital Provision in Early Twentieth-Century Britain by Barry Doyle], as Martin Gorsky and the author discuss a new study of Britain’s inter-war health services (no. 1733, with response here).

Then we turn to Lynn Hunt’s Writing History in the Global Era. Julia McClure believes this book’s identification of globalization as a paradigm establishes the foundations for analysing the meanings and implications of globalization narratives (no. 1732).

Next up is The Smile Revolution In Eighteenth Century Paris by Colin Jones, and Jennifer Wallis finds this book beautifully complicates the notion that the smile is a static and timeless form of emotional expression (no. 1731).

Finally we have Little “Red Scares”: Anti-Communism and Political Repression in the United States, 1921-1946, edited by Robert Justin Goldstein. Jennifer Luff welcomes a new edited collection on inter-war anti-communism (no. 1730).

 

New reviews: Trust, Italian Army, British India and Colonial Boston

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hoskingWe kick off this week with Geoffrey Hosking’s Trust: A History, with Eric M. Uslaner and the author disagreeing over this key issue (no. 1729, with response here).

Next up is The Italian Army and the First World War by John Gooch. Mario Draper reviews a book which will almost certainly remain a seminal text for scholars of the period and anyone else interested in European military history (no. 1728).

Then we turn to G. J. Bryant’s The Emergence of British Power in India, 1600-1784: A Grand Strategic Interpretation, and James Lees finds this book to be a refreshing addition to the historiography (no. 1727).

Finally we have Robert Love’s Warnings: Searching for Strangers in Colonial Boston by Cornelia Hughes Dayton and Sharon Salinger. Kristin O’Brassill-Kulfan believes this research fills an important gap in the on-the-ground history of pre-industrial poverty in the United States (no. 1726).

New reviews: John Wyclif, Medieval space, Cypriot communists and labour and liberalism

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1280px-Wycliffecollege_toronto_chapel1We start this week with John Wyclif on War and Peace by Rory Cox. Christopher Allmand and the reviewer discuss a work which places Wyclif in a long historical context (no. 1725, with response here).

Then we turn to Space in the Medieval West: Places, Territories, and Imagined Geographies, edited by Meredith Cohen and Fanny Madeline. Sarah Ann Milne recommends a book which serves to substantiate and complement existing studies whilst offering a number of fascinating new explorations (no. 1724).

Next up is Yiannakis Kolokasidis’s History of the Communist Party in Cyprus: Colonialism, Class and the Cypriot Left, which Alexios Alecou finds to be an original contribution, rich with theoretical insights and practical implications (no. 1723).

Finally we turn to Labour and the Caucus: Working-Class Radicalism and Organised Liberalism in England, 1868-1888 by James Owen. Jules Gehrke believes this book is sure to become a valued part of the scholarly conversation (no. 1722).

New reviews: Eurasian Borderlands, peace, early American wars, Reformation

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eurasia-map-oldWe start with The Struggle for the Eurasian Borderlands: From the Rise of Early Modern Empires to the End of the First World War by Alfred Rieber. Simone Pelizza and the author discuss a book which is destined to be an indispensable reference work for both students and researchers for many years to come (no. 1721, with response here).

Next up is William Mulligan’s The Great War for Peace. Cyril Pearce reviews a significant, if flawed, contribution to the debate about the impact of the First World War (no. 1720).

Then we have the Encyclopedia of the Wars of the Early American Republic, 1783-1812: A Political, Social, and Military History, edited by Spencer C. Tucker, which Jonathan Chandler believes this encyclopedia will be a welcome addition to the shelves of any library (no. 1719).

Finally we turn to Reformation Unbound: Protestant Visions of Reform in England, 1525–1590 by Karl Gunther. Donald McKim finds this to be a splendid study which clearly delineates the various Protestant visions of reform in England (no. 1718).

New reviews: Lincoln and Latin America, English clergy, Louis XIV and the Indian Army

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lincolndouglasWe start this week with Slavery, Race and Conquest in the Tropics : Lincoln, Douglas, and the Future of Latin America by Robert E. May. Phillip Magness and the author debate a book which gives us a Civil War that was both the product of international affairs, and a shaping force on their subsequent course (no. 1717, with response here).

Then we turn to Hugh M. Thomas’s The Secular Clergy in England, 1066-1216, and Katherine Harvey and the author discuss a book which is surely destined to become one of the definitive works in the field for many years to come (no. 1716, with response here).

Next up is Status Interaction During the Reign of Louis XIV by Giora Sternberg. Linda Kiernan believes this book presents historians of the court with a vigorous model to test (no. 1715).

Finally we have George Morton-Jack’s The Indian Army on the Western Front: India’s Expeditionary Force to France and Belgium in the First World War. Adam Prime finds this to be an extremely stimulating book, which should appeal to academics and enthusiasts alike (no. 1714).

New reviews: London women, Tokyo Zoo, Callaghan Government, Mystic Ark

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williamsFirst up is Women, Work and Sociability in Early Modern London by Tim Reinke-Williams. Hannah Hogan and the author discuss an inspiring starting-point for further, in-depth histories of women, work and sociability in early modern England (no. 1713, with response here).

Then we turn to Ian Jared Miller’s The Nature of the Beasts: Empire and Exhibition at the Tokyo Imperial Zoo, which Jonathan Saha recommends as being important beyond its obvious and substantial contribution to both Japanese history and zoo history (no. 1712).

Next up is Crisis? What Crisis? The Callaghan Government and the British ‘Winter of Discontent’ by John Shepherd. Ian Cawood reviews a concisely written, forensic political analysis of the defining historical myth by which all British political parties still live (no. 1711).

Finally we have The Mystic Ark: Hugh of Saint Victor, Art, and Thought in the Twelfth Century by Conrad Rudolph, which Karl Kinsella believes to be a thoroughly worked out and thoughtful piece of scholarship (no. 1710).

 

New reviews: Andrew Melville, Ireland and the Congo, Napoleon and the Royal Navy

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Andrew_Melville_upbraids_a_bishop_at_the_court_of_James_VI

Andrew Melville upbraiding a bishop

First up this week we have Andrew Melville (1545–1622): Writings, Reception, and Reputation, edited by Steven J. Reid and Roger Mason. Alasdair Raffe and the editors discuss an edited collection from which there is much to learn, both about a poet and intellectual, and about his religious and political circumstances (no. 1709, with response here).

Next up, Michael Kennedy and Art Magennis’s Ireland, the United Nations and the Congo, and Bernadette Whelan tackles this meticulously researched and tightly argued work of military and diplomatic history (no. 1708).

Then we have to thank Charles Esdaile casting his eye over a number of major works produced to mark the bicentenary of Napoleon’s downfall, as he reviews Napoleon: Soldier of Destiny by Michael Broers; Citizen Emperor: Napoleon in Power, 1799-1815 by Philip Dwyer; Napoleon by Alan Forrest; Napoleon: the End of Glory by Munro Price; and Forging Napoleon’s Grande Armée: Motivation, Military Culture and Masculinity in the French Army, 1800-1808 by Michael J. Hughes (no. 1707, with response here).

Finally, we turn to the History of the Royal Navy, and Richard Harding and the series editor Duncan Redford discuss the first three volumes of a new history of the British Navy (no. 1706, with response here).

New reviews: 1812 revisited, Kershaw interview, phenomenology and the history of the psyche

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kershaw2We start with the latest installment in our occasional podcast series. Daniel Snowman talks to Professor Sir Ian Kershaw about his forthcoming contribution to the Penguin History of Europe series (no. 1705).

Next, following his original piece for us last year, Jasper Trautsch has revised and updated his overview of works on the War of 1812, taking into account a number of new publications (no. 1387).

Then we turn to David Carr’s Experience and History: Phenomenological Perspectives on the Historical World. Hanna Clutterbuck thinks this book will be a valuable resource for almost any historian interested in thinking more widely about his or her subject (no. 1704).

Finally we have The Transformation of the Psyche in British Primary Care 1880-1970 by Rhodri Hayward. Roger Smith and the author discuss a book which successfully marries the theoretically reflexive practices of science studies and cultural studies with the empirical precision historians necessarily demand (no. 1703, with response here).

New reviews: African intervention, medicine and religion, Ireland and colonialism and Jazz Age New York

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millerWe start this week with Elizabeth Schmidt’s Foreign Intervention in Africa: From the Cold War to the War on Terror, as Jason Robinson and the author discuss a book which should prove useful and readable to many of those new to post-Cold War African history (no. 1702, with response here).

Next up is Medicine and Religion: A Historical Introduction by Gary B. Ferngren. Sophie Mann believes this work merits readership from any non-expert seeking a historical perspective on religious attitudes to sickness and healing (no. 1701).

Then we turn to Audrey Horning’s Ireland in a Virginia Sea. Emma Hart reviews a book which is a reminder that as historians move towards ever larger scales of inquiry, they should make sure that they integrate their approach with the insights provided by micro-history (no. 1700).

Finally we have a review article on Jazz Age New York by Christian O’Connell, in which he tackles Imperial Blues: Geographies of Race and Sex in Jazz Age New York by Fiona I. B. Ngô and Donald Miller’s Supreme City: How Jazz Age Manhattan Gave Birth to Modern America, which demonstrate that its history is a fertile ground for new scholarship, but also reveal the city’s ability to dazzle even the keenest minds (no. 1699).

New reviews: Anglo-Saxon theology, Scottish Enlightenment towns, early modern faith and WW1 diaries

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Wulfstan Archbishop of York 1002-1023

Wulfstan Archbishop of York 1002-1023

We start this week with Heaven and Earth in Anglo-Saxon England: Theology and Society in an Age of Faith by Helen Foxhall Forbes. Máirín Mac Carron and the author discuss a book which breaks new ground in considering the widespread Anglo-Saxon population’s engagement with Christian beliefs (no. 1698, with response here).

Then we turn to Bob Harris and Charles McKean’s The Scottish Town in the Age of the Enlightenment 1740-1820, which Ian Donnachie finds to be a formidable and scholarly volume, and a major contribution to urban, social and cultural history (no. 1697).

Next up is The Soteriology of James Ussher The Act and Object of Saving Faith by Richard Snoddy, which Susan Royal welcomes as a major contribution to the field of historical theology (no. 1696).

Finally we have the acerbic Margot Asquith’s Great War Diary 1914-1916: The View from Downing Street, edited by Michael and Eleanor Brock. Iain Sharpe reviews a labour of love carried out with great care and professionalism (no. 1695).

 

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