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Author Archives: juliespraggon


New Historical Research articles published online

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Recovering Charles I’s art collection: some implications of the 1660 Act of Indemnity and Oblivion. Andrew Barclay

After 1660 Charles II attempted to recover those royal goods which had been sold off by parliament following his father’s execution. The assumption has been that this was straightforward confiscation. The 1660 Act of Indemnity, however, contained a deliberate loophole protecting the rights of royal servants granted goods in lieu of arrears. A review of the legal cases arising from that act confirms that this was understood and accepted at the time. Yet many of those exempted goods are known to have re-entered the Royal Collection, raising the possibility that a significant number of them were returned voluntarily.

‘Such nonsense that it cannot be true’: the Jacobite reaction to George Lockhart of Carnwath’s Memoirs Concerning the Affairs of Scotland. Daniel Szechi

This article is a response to the critique of the Jacobite George Lockhart of Carnwath’s, Memoirs Concerning the Affairs of Scotland published by Christopher Whatley and Derek Patrick in the Journal of Scottish Historical Studies in 2007. Whatley and Patrick argued that Lockhart’s influential account of the Union has for too long been uncritically accepted by historians. This article builds on their use of contemporary whig reactions to its version of events by reviewing the text in light of critical Jacobite sources (Lockhart’s acerbic narrative also antagonized many of his comrades-in-arms). It nonetheless, concludes that neither whig nor Jacobite critics of the Memoirs diminish its usefulness as a source. Ultimately both bodies of criticism focus on particular moments, rather than on the Memoirs as a whole, and far from all the criticisms were valid. Thus if the text is handled according to the regular canons of historical evidence it more than retains its value for the historian.

Notable protests: respectable resistance in occupied northern France, 1914–18. James E. Connolly

This article introduces the notion of ‘respectable resistance’ as a way of conceptualizing French notables’ protests against German policies during the occupation of the département of the Nord in the First World War. It argues that this did constitute a form of resistance that was relatively widespread, occasionally organized, and legalistic. Although this opposition was largely unsuccessful in practical terms, it sometimes worked as a stalling tactic. Its real success was as a performative demonstration of the notables’ defence of compatriots, reinforcing their social/political status, and it was born of patriotism, a sense of duty, but also fears of future judgment.

 

 

Historical Research – Election Special

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singometerNew virtual issue on Elections: a collection of previously published articles from Historical Research and podcasts from the IHR research seminar series. Content freely available until the end of May 2015

Parliamentary Elections in the Reign of Edward I.  J. S. Illsley

 The Coventry Parliament of 1459: a Privy Seal Writ concerning the Election of Knights of the Shire.  S. J. Payling

The Origins of the Nottinghamshire Whigs: an Analysis of the Subscribers to the Election Expenses of Sir Scrope Howe and John White.  P. R. Seddon

Radicalism and Public Opinion in the General Election of 1784
. Paul Kelly

Electoral violence in mid nineteenth-century England and Wales. Justin Wasserman and Edwin Jaggard

Uniting the whole people: proportional representation in Great Britain, 1884–5, reconsidered
. Ted R. Bromund

Joseph Chamberlain, the Conservative party and the Leamington Spa candidature dispute of 1895
. Ian Cawood

The Parliamentary Electoral System, the ‘Fourth’ Reform Act and the Rise of Labour in England and Wales. Duncan Tanner

‘Rival foundlings’: the Ross and Cromarty by-election, 10 February 1936.  Ewen A. Cameron

Rethinking a progressive moment: the Liberal and Labour parties in the 1945 general election. Peter Sloman

Voluntary Action History podcastCampaigning the vote.  Elizabeth Crawford (Voluntary Action History podcast)

 

New Historical Research article

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The seditious murder of Thomas of Sibthorpe and the Great Statute of Treasons, 1351–2. David Crookmurder

Thomas of Sibthorpe, a Nottinghamshire clergyman and chancery clerk, prospered under the regime of Edward II and his favourite Hugh Despenser the younger, and again under Edward III, when he also became a clerk of parliament and a justice of assize and of the peace. In 1326 he established at Sibthorpe a college of chantry priests to pray for his soul and those of others; it was twice expanded and more lavishly endowed, in 1335 and 1343. He appointed a keeper or warden to take charge of the college, and used all available legal means to ensure that the endowment was firmly appropriated to the warden, who was obliged periodically to render him accounts. In 1351 the third warden, Robert of Kneeton, aided by others, allegedly murdered him in order to avoid rendering such an account. They were tried at a Nottingham gaol delivery, convicted of seditious killing and sentenced to be drawn and hanged, the punishment reserved for traitors, because the victim was a royal clerk and justice. The circumstances of Sibthorpe’s death may have had a significant effect on the terms of the first Great Statute of Treasons, adopted by parliament only a few months later, and presumably incorporating the views of the most senior judges in England.

Annual Pollard Prize 2015

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Entries are invited for this year’s Pollard Prize (sponsored by Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.) awarded for the best paper presented at an IHR seminar 2014-15 by a postgraduate student or by a researcher within one year of completing the PhD.1096214263368_PXYJwtsF_l

First prize

Fast track publication in the prestigious IHR journal, Historical Research, and £200 of Blackwell books.

Runner up prizes

Publication in Historical Research, and a selection of Blackwell books.

Application

Applicants are required to have delivered a paper during the academic year in which the award is made. Submissions should be supported by a reference from a convenor of the appropriate seminar. Papers should be fully footnoted, although it is not necessary at this stage to follow Historical Research house style. All papers submitted must be eligible for publication.

The closing date for submissions is  30 May 2015

Enquiries and submissions should be directed to the Executive Editor, Historical Research (Jane.Winters@sas.ac.uk).

New Historical Research articles

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Humanitarian assistance during the Rif War (Morocco, 1921–6): the International Committee of the Red Cross and ‘an unfortunate affair by Pablo La Porte

This article focuses on the role of the International Committee of the Red Cross (I.C.R.C.) in the Rif War (Morocco, 1921–6) and places humanitarian action in three inter-related contexts: the complexity of the international scenario after the First World War, the institutional architecture of the Red Cross and the developments in international humanitarian law. Challenging simplistic approaches to an otherwise historically overlooked affair, the article argues that the rather undignified role of the I.C.R.C. during the conflict was a result both of Eurocentric assumptions and international manipulation.

Liberal Unionism and political representation in Wales, c.1886–1893 by Naomi Lloyd-Jones

This article reassesses the history of Liberal Unionism in Wales and the impact the Irish Home Rule crisis had on constituency politics. Liberal associations played a crucial role in the revolt against ‘dissentient’ M.P.s, whom they charged with ‘misrepresenting’ constituency opinion (as articulated by the ‘caucus’). This damaged Liberal Unionism irreparably, and the party failed to build a viable organizational machinery that could beat the Liberals at their own game. Yet this study of failure tells us much about attitudes toward representation and illustrates the importance of a grass-roots approach to a vital period in Welsh and British political history

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Historical Research article online

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policeLocal initiative, central oversight, provincial perspective: governing police forces in nineteenth-century Leeds by David Churchill

This article examines police administration as a branch of urban government, based on a case study of Leeds between 1815 and 1900. Making extensive use of local government and police records, it takes a longer-term view of ‘reform’ than most existing studies, and privileges the more routine aspects of everyday governance. It thus provides an original exploration of central-local government relations, as well as conflict and negotiation between distinct bodies of self-government within the locality. Previous studies have rightly emphasized that urban police governance was primarily a local responsibility, yet this article also stresses the influence of central state oversight and an extra-local, provincial perspective, both of which modified the grip of localism on nineteenth-century government.

Latest issue of Historical Research – Feb 2015 (vol. 88, no. 239)

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promenading2Articles

Intelligence and intrigue in the March of Wales: noblewomen and the fall of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, 1274–82. Emma Cavell

Famine is not the problem: a historical perspective. Cormac Ó Gráda

False traitors or worthy knights? Treason and rebellion against Edward II in the Scalacronica and the Anglo-Norman prose Brut chronicles. Andy King

Radical Geneva? The publication of Knox’s First Blast of the Trumpet and Goodman’s How Superior Powers Oght to be Obeyd in context. Charlotte Panofre

The rise of the promeneur: walking the city in eighteenth-century Paris. Laurent Turcot

Black people and the criminal justice system: prejudice and practice in later eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century London. Peter King and John Carter Wood

Moral economies and the cold chain. Susanne Freidberg

Eugenics, socialism and artificial insemination: the public career of Herbert Brewer. David Redvaldsen

Can we conquer unemployment? The Liberal party, public works and the 1931 political crisis. Peter Sloman

Notes and Documents

Lord Burghley’s ‘Ten precepts’ for his son, Robert Cecil: a new date and interpretation. Fred B. Tromly

New Historical Research articles online

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Through French eyes: Victorian cities in the eighteen-forties viewed by Léon Faucher by Philip Morey

This article examines the motivation, scope, findings and reception of the survey of London, Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds and Birmingham which the French journalist Léon Faucher published in Etudes sur l’Angleterre (1843–5). Sources include Faucher’s letters, the original and revised text, the English translator’s notes, and reviews in the British, French and German press. Faucher’s fieldwork led him to question liberal orthodoxy and propose remedies to alleviate working-class distress. Exceptionally in eighteen-forties Britain, the continental socio-economic treatise was widely discussed and acclaimed. Elucidating Faucher’s thought and setting it in context illuminates the contrast between him and other writers, particularly Friedrich Engels.

Religion, politics and patronage in the late Hanoverian navy, c.1780–c.1820 by Gareth Atkins

Sir Charles Middleton, Lord Barham (1726–1813), occupies a pivotal place in naval history. His evangelical religiosity is well known, but while considerable attention has been given to how this shaped his administrative reforms, his manipulation of patronage to promote his co-religionists has, until now, been ignored or brushed under the carpet. This article uses contemporary correspondence, diaries and printed works to reconstruct for the first time a powerful nexus that bound Pittite politicians to Wilberforce and his circle, one that spanned parliament, the church, naval administration and the seagoing officer corps. In doing so it throws new light on how evangelicals gained such a strong foothold in late Hanoverian public affairs.

An unrealized cult? Hagiography and Norman ducal genealogy in twelfth-century England by Ilya Afanasyev

This article traces the adoption and ideological uses of the image of the pious Norman dukes in four consecutive hagiographical texts written in twelfth-century England. While this is a well-known topos of the earlier Norman tradition, its reception in England has been neglected in the existing scholarship. The article also examines further evidence of an interest in pious Norman dukes under Henry II, focusing on the translation of the remains of Richard I and Richard II at Fécamp in Normandy in 1162 and discussing whether the dukes’ official cult could have been established. The conclusion situates the material in the general context of the development of the cults of lay rulers in twelfth-century Europe and sheds light on the interplay between hagiography, historical memory and politics at the time.

Historical Research – new online submissions system

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2BVRD00ZAnnouncing our new online submission process

As part of our continuing efforts to support both authors and reviewers, we are pleased to announce that  Historical Research has adopted an online submission and peer review system, ScholarOne Manuscripts. All new manuscript submissions should now be made at https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/historicalresearch

We hope that authors and reviewers will find the new system convenient and we look forward to a streamlined review process, leading to quicker decision making and ensuring that the time from submission to publication is as short as possible.

New Historical Research article

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Now the mask is taken off’: Jacobitism and colonial New England, 1702–27 by David Parrish

Jacobitism has been shown to be an integral and enduring element of British culture, especially during the twenty-six years following the Revolution of 1688. Yet few attempts have been made to explore the impact or existence of Jacobitism in the British Atlantic world. This article locates and examines the presence of Jacobitism in the religious controversies and transatlantic print culture of colonial New England from 1702 to 1727 and draws tentative conclusions about the existence and significance of Jacobitism in the British Atlantic.