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Author Archives: juliespraggon


Historical Research: new early view articles

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Royal 10 E.IV, f.18vIntelligence and intrigue in the March of Wales: noblewomen and the fall of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, 1274–82 by Emma Cavell

This article examines the part played by key baronial wives of the Welsh Marches in the defeat of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd in 1282. It explores the hidden involvement of women in the conquest of Wales and considers the opportunities available to noblewomen, particularly non-widows, in the Welsh Marches and beyond.

Licit medicine or ‘Pythagorean necromancy’? The ‘Sphere of Life and Death’ in late medieval England by Joanne Edge

 The Elizabethan succession question in Roger Edwardes’s ‘Castra Regia’ (1569) and ‘Cista Pacis Anglie’ (1576) by Victoria Smith

 ‘A considerable portion of the defence of the Empire’: Lisbon and victualling the royal navy during the French Revolutionary War, 1793–1802 by Martin Robson

 Provincial news networks in late Elizabethan Devon by Ian Cooper

Historical Research – new articles published online

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Royal 10 E.IV, f.18v

Intelligence and intrigue in the March of Wales: noblewomen and the fall of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, 1274–82 by Emma Cavell

Licit medicine or ‘Pythagorean necromancy’? The ‘Sphere of Life and Death’ in late medieval England
by Joanne Edge

The Elizabethan succession question in Roger Edwardes’s ‘Castra Regia’ (1569) and ‘Cista Pacis Anglie’ (1576) by Victoria Smith

A considerable portion of the defence of the Empire’: Lisbon and victualling the royal navy during the French Revolutionary War, 1793–1802 by Martin Robson

Provincial news networks in late Elizabethan Devon by Ian Cooper

Historical Research – new virtual issue

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220px-Elizabeth_Fry_by_Charles_Robert_LeslieThe new virtual issue of Historical Research (Spring 2014)  draws together past and present articles and podcasts on the theme of Charity and Philanthropy.

Articles:

The Medieval Leper-house at ‘Lamford’, Cornwall. Nicholas Orme and Oliver Padel

‘Inky Blots and Rotten Parchment Bonds’: London, Charity briefs and the Guildhall Library. Mark Harris

Fire Disasters and Fire Relief in Sixteenth-century England: the Nantwich Fire of 1583. C. J. Kitghing

Faith, hope and money: the Jesuits and the genesis of fundraising for education, 1550–1650. Dame Olwen Hufton

‘In a few years we shall none of us that now take care of them be here’: Philanthropy and the State in the Thinking of Elizabeth Fry. Anne Summers

Female Philanthropy and Domestic Service in Victorian England. F. K. Prochaska

Working hard at giving it away: Lord Duveen, the British Museum and the Elgin marbles. Elisabeth Kehoe

Eggs, rags and whist drives: popular munificence and the development of provincial medical voluntarism between the wars. Nick Hayes and Barry M. Doyle

‘Every Citizen of Empire Implored to Save the Children!’ Empire, internationalism and the Save the Children Fund in inter-war Britain. Emily Baughan

Before the Cultural Cold Wars: American philanthropy and cultural diplomacy in the inter-war years. Katharina Rietzler

Working for the Germans: British voluntary societies and the German refugee crisis, 1945–50. Matthew Frank

 Podcasts:

Cultures of giving and charity: the Clothworkers Company in early modern London. Annaleigh Margey

Voluntarism and democracy in Britain since the 1790s. Brian Harrison

CIMG3713 ‘Improved dwellings for the industrious classes’: H.A. Darbishire’s Peabody model and its relevance for contemporary housing. Irina Davidovici

Fashioning Mothers of the Next Generation: Philanthropy in Birmingham and Sydney, 1860-1914. Elizabeth Harvey

Two Tier Philanthropy: the Philanthropists who funded the Bishop of London’s Fund and the work that the Fund financed, 1863 to 1914. Sarah Flew

Saving Aboriginal Children: Save the Children Aboriginal Preschools, white volunteers and the rural colour bar. Jennifer Jones

Historical Research – online early articles

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communism-radio-free-europe-v-usaVarious early view articles now available from Historical Research, including ‘For the freedom of captive European nations’: east European exiles in the Cold War by Martin Nekola. This article looks at the activities of political exiles from the countries of east-central and south-east Europe in the West, particularly in the U.S.A., during the Cold War. It discusses the formation of political organizations for a number of individual national exile groups, and explains that their role and standing were essentially derived from changes in international politics. The characteristic view of these anti-communist groups includes internal crises and conflicts, which were often rooted in petty quarrels, personal animosity, arguments about the legitimacy of leading bodies, an absence of charismatic leadership, and the predominance of propaganda in their work.

Also just out:

Can we conquer unemployment? The Liberal party, public works and the 1931 political crisis byPeter Sloman

Prelude to the Opium War? British reactions to the ‘Napier Fizzle’ and attitudes towards China in the mid eighteen-thirties by GAO Hao

 

Latest issue of Historical Research – May 2014 (vol 87, no 236)

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miners 2The new issue of Historical Research is now available, and among the articles is ’Rank-and-file movements and political change before the Great War: the Durham miners’ “Forward Movement”‘ by Lewis Mates, which examines political change in the Durham Miners’ Association (D.M.A.), one of the best-established, largest and most influential Edwardian trade unions.

Other content includes:

The hue and cry in medieval English towns by Samantha Sagui

The impact of land accumulation and consolidation on population trends in the pre-industrial period: two contrasting cases in the Low Countries by D. R. Curtis

Kinship and diplomacy in sixteenth-century Scotland: the earl of Northumberland’s Scottish captivity in its domestic and international context, 1569–72 by Amy Blakeway

Thinking outside the gundeck: maritime history, the royal navy and the outbreak of British civil war, 1625–42 (pages 251–274) by Richard J. Blakemore

The dominion of history: the export of historical research from Britain since 1850 by Miles Taylor

From anti-colonialism to anti-imperialism: the evolution of H. M. Hyndman’s critique of empire, c.1875–1905 by Marcus Morris

The myth of sovereignty: British immigration control in policy and practice in the nineteen-seventies by Evan Smith and Marinella Marmo

See here for more details.

Historical Research – new Early View articles published

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  •  The other boys of Kilmichael’: No. 2 Section, ‘C’ Company, Auxiliary Division Royal Irish Constabulary, 28 November 1920 by Andrew Nelson
  • Female barrenness, bodily access and aromatic treatments in seventeenth-century England by Jennifer Evans
  • The harassment of Isaac Allen: puritanism, parochial politics and Prestwich’s troubles during the first English civil war by James Mawdesley [OPEN ACCESS]
  • ‘You are what you eat’: historical changes in ideas about food and identity by Steven Shapin
 
 See Wiley/Historical Research Early View

The Annual Pollard Prize 2014 – closing date Friday 30 May

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Pollard_w5cmEntries are invited for this year’s Annual Pollard Prize (sponsored by Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.) awarded for the best paper presented at an IHR seminar by a postgraduate student or by a researcher within one year of completing the PhD.

First prize

Fast track publication in the prestigious IHR journal, Historical Research, and £200 of Blackwell books.

Runner up prizes

Publication in Historical Research, and a selection of Blackwell books.

Application

Applicants are required to have delivered a paper during the academic year in which the award is made. Submissions should be supported by a reference from a convenor of the appropriate seminar. Papers should be fully footnoted, although it is not necessary at this stage to follow Historical Research house style. All papers submitted must be eligible for publication.

The closing date for submissions is Friday 30 May 2014

Enquiries and submissions should be directed to the Executive Editor, Historical Research (Jane.Winters@sas.ac.uk). If you are unable to submit by email, please include a PC disk or CD-Rom with any postal submission to:

The Editor
Historical Research (Pollard Prize)
Institute of Historical Research
University of London
Senate House
London WC1E 7HU

Historical Research – February 2014 (vol. 87, no. 235)

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obesity-1-Feb 2014‘To[o] much eating stifles the child’: fat bodies and reproduction in early modern England. Sarah Toulalan

Other contents:

  • Hiding the truth: exegetical discussions of Abraham’s lie from Hugh of St. Victor to Stephen Langton. Emily Corran
  • Dorset in the period of baronial reform and rebellion, 1258–67. Huw Ridgeway
  • High clergy and printers: anti-Reformation polemic in the kingdom of Poland, 1520–36. Natalia Nowakowska
  • The misuse of loyalty? James Dundas and the faculty of advocates’ letter to Queen Anne of 1711. Adrian Lashmore-Davies
  • Pressing the French and defending the Palmerstonian line: Lord William Hervey and The Times, 1846–8. Laurence M. Guymer
  • ‘They seem to have all died out’: witches and witchcraft in Lark Rise to Candleford and the English countryside, c.1830–1930. Thomas Waters
  • Investigating the sixties at a sixties institution: teaching as historiography. Lucy Robinson and Chris Warne

See Historical Research/Wiley

Historical Research – November 2013 (vol. 86, no. 234)

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The latest issue of Historical Research (vol. 86, no. 234) is now available, and includes the following articles:

Stormont’s response to American racial segregation in Northern Ireland during the Second World War by Simon Topping (FREE ACCESS)

Bishops and deans: London and the province of Canterbury in the twelfth century by D. P. Johnson

Reintroducing the emperor and repositioning the city republics in the ‘republican’ thought of the rhetorician Boncompagno da Signa by Gianluca Raccagni

Chivalry, British sovereignty and dynastic politics: undercurrents of antagonism in Tudor-Stewart relations, c.1490−c.1513 by Katie Stevenson (online open: FREE ACCESS)

Remembering usurpation: the common lawyers, Reformation narratives and the prerogative, 1578–1616 by David Chan Smith

‘The embers of expiring sedition’: Maurice Margarot, the Scottish martyrs monument and the production of radical memory across the British South Pacific by David S. Karr

Canning, the principle of non-interference and the struggle for influence in Portugal, 1822–5 by Norihito Yamada

‘The People’s Advocate, Champion and Friend’: the transatlantic career of Citizen John De Morgan (1848–1926) by Rob Allen

Eggs, rags and whist drives: popular munificence and the development of provincial medical voluntarism between the wars by Nick Hayes and Barry M. Doyle

Historical Research – new early view articles

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‘They seem to have all died out’: witches and witchcraft in Lark Rise to Candleford and the English countryside, c.1830–1930. Thomas Waters

Flora Thompson’s account of the English countryside during the 1880s–1890s – Lark Rise to Candleford – continues to be an important source for rural history. In that text the protagonist’s mother says that witches had ‘all died out’, and none had been known in her generation. The informants of late Victorian folklorists sometimes made similar remarks. Historians have taken such statements about witchcraft being a thing of the past at face value, inferring from them that plebeian concern about its influence was disappearing during the final decades of the nineteenth century. This article uses evidence from the English south midlands, and insights provided by anthropological studies of sorcery, to suggest an alternative interpretation. Rather than being a sincere statement of belief, assertions that witches had ‘all died out’ were part of a strategy to avoid speaking about a dreaded subject. Such pains were taken because it was believed that talking about witchcraft was a dangerous activity that would lead to the bewitchment of anyone with a loose tongue.

And check out our other latest articles on Early View:

Bishops and deans: London and the province of Canterbury in the twelfth century.D. P. Johnson

Chivalry, British sovereignty and dynastic politics: undercurrents of antagonism in Tudor-Stewart relations, c.1490−c.1513. Katie Stevenson

Pressing the French and defending the Palmerstonian line: Lord William Hervey and The Times, 1846–8. Laurence Guymer

Remembering usurpation: the common lawyers, Reformation narratives and the prerogative, 1578–1616. David Chan Smith