The IHR Blog |

On the web

Open access has long been discussed and debated on the web, most often in blog posts or on dedicated blogs, but also in newspapers and other forms of digital publication. As elsewhere on this site, the collection of links below is not meant to be comprehensive, but to give you an idea of the issues. If you would like to suggest other blogs/blog posts to which we should link, just email us at IHR.Webmaster@sas.ac.uk.

Newspapers, periodicals and journal special issues

Times Higher Education regularly features the open access debate, focusing on the position in the UK. Recent articles include:

In the US, the Chronicle of Higher Education is similarly concerned with open access. Recent articles and blog posts include:

The Guardian Higher Education Network also frequently deals with open access. The relevant posts have been collected together under an open access tag. The posts range in scope from ‘Open access: why academic publishers still add value‘ to ‘Open access: four ways it could enhance academic freedom‘.

While its emphasis is necessarily on STM, a special issue of Nature on ‘The future of publishing‘ (495, 28 March 2013) contains much of relevance for the humanities and social sciences too. Of particular interest are:

While also focusing on the sciences, an article in The New York Times entitled ‘Scientific articles accepted (personal checks, too)‘ focuses on the growing problem of so-called predatory open access publishers.

 

Blogs which deal substantially with open access

An exhaustive list of blogs dealing primarily with open access is published under the auspices of the Open Access Directory, along with a range of other useful material. Many of these focus on STEM subjects, but the following select list may be useful:

While not strictly speaking a blog, the information site for the Open Library of Humanities pulls together interesting material specifically for HSS.

Individual blog posts and articles

Single posts about open access on personal blogs are the hardest for us to track, so do let us know about anything which has caught your attention. We’ve listed here some of those which we have found informative or thought-provoking recently.

And finally, for something a bit different, a vodcast of Jason Kelly’s seminar at the IHR on ‘An ecology for digital scholarship’.