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Author Archives: juliespraggon


August issue of Historical Research

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Historical Research, vol. xc, no. 249

Two men in prison MS Ludwig XIV 6 (Getty open content)

Contents:

Getting out of jail: suicide, escape and release in late medieval and Renaissance Bologna. Trevor Dean

The 1553 succession crisis reconsidered. Paulina Kewes

Whose city? Civic government and episcopal power in early modern Salisbury, c.1590–1640. Catherine Patterson

‘I was no “master of this work” but a servant to it’? William Laud, Charles I and the making of Scottish ecclesiastical policy, 1634–6. Leonie James [open access]

Between tension and rapprochement: Sunni-Shi‘ite relations in the pre-modern Ottoman period, with a focus on the eighteenth century. M. Sait Özervarlı

One of the best men of business we had ever met’: Thomas Drummond, the boundary commission and the 1832 Reform Act. Martin Spychal [open access]

Charles Mason, the ‘king of China’: British imperial adventuring in the late nineteenth century. Catherine Ladds

‘That racial chasm that yawns eternally in our midst’: the British empire and the politics of Asian migration, 1900–14. Cornelis Heere

Invasion, raids and army reform: the political context of ‘flotilla defence’, 1903–5. Richard Dunley

‘And those who live, how shall I tell their fame?’ Historical pageants, collective remembrance and the First World War, 1919–39. Angela Bartie, Linda Fleming, Mark Freeman, Tom Hulme, Paul Readman and Charlotte Tupman [open access]

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Pollard and Neale Prize winners 2017

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Congratulations to the winners of the Pollard and Neale prizes:

Sir John Neale Prize in Early Modern British History

The Neale Prize is awarded annually to a historian in the early stages of his or her career for an essays on a theme related to the history of early modern Britain.

Winner: Stephen Tong of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, for ‘The Doctrine of the Sabbath in the Edwardian Reformation’

 

The Annual Pollard Prize (sponsored by Wiley)

The Pollard Prize is awarded annually for the best paper presented at an Institute of Historical Research seminar by a postgraduate student or by a researcher within one year of completing the PhD.

Winner:  Kenneth Duggan of Kings College, London,  for ‘The Limits of Strong Government: Attempts to Control Criminality in Thirteenth-Century England’, paper given to the European History Seminar 1150-1500

Runner up: Imogen Peck of the University of Bristol, for  ‘A chronology of some memorable accidents’: the representation of the recent past in English almanacs, 1648-1660, paper given to the History Lab seminar

The papers will be published in Historical Research

 

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New Historical Research articles

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Nader Shah’s portrait from the collection of the Smithsonian Institution

Between tension and rapprochement: Sunni-Shi‘ite relations in the pre-modern Ottoman period, with a focus on the eighteenth century by M. Sait Özervarlı

The Ottoman empire is known for its ethnically and religiously pluralistic social fabric, but also for defending the mainstream Sunni branch of Islam in opposition to its Iranian Safavid rival. This article revisits the Ottoman construction of Sunnism and suggests that, despite strict state policies from above to exclude Shi‘ites and communal pressures from below in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, channels of dialogue could not be closed down in the long term. By focusing on a specific intra-religious dialogue of 1743, that aimed at reconciliation between Sunnis and Shi‘ites, this article highlights a probable case of ‘de-confessionalization’. Close examination of the textual account of this inter-communal meeting demonstrates how the Ottomans were torn between defending their Sunni identity and the need for rapprochement to avoid further sectarianism in broader Muslim society.

 

Invasion, raids and army reform: the political context of ‘flotilla defence’, 1903–5 by Richard Dunley

A1 class submarine, 1902

In response to the pressure of the invasion debates of 1903–1905 the Admiralty developed a new strategy, ‘flotilla defence’, to counter arguments brought forward by the War Office. This concept was a purely political one; it was a cynical bid to mislead the Committee of Imperial Defence in order to secure naval funding. By placing ‘flotilla defence’ in this context this article will demonstrate that it was not, as has been claimed, a revolutionary naval strategy, but part of the polarization of defence policy which led to a breakdown in relations between the army and the navy.

 

‘And those who live, how shall I tell their fame?’ Historical pageants, collective remembrance and the First World War, 1919–39 by Angela Bartie, Linda Fleming, Mark Freeman, Tom Hulme, Paul Readman and Charlotte Tupman  [open access]

Oxford Historical Pageant, 1907 (Wikimedia Commons)

This article examines the ways in which the First World War was represented in historical pageants during the interwar period. Pageants in this period are often overlooked as sites of commemoration and dramatic representation. Three types of pageant are identified: those that portrayed the war hyper-realistically, those which relied on symbolism and allegory to convey messages about war and peace, and those which sought to incorporate the war into the longer histories of the communities whose pasts they depicted. The article argues that ‘traditional’ forms of representation of the past proved to be resilient features of popular commemoration and remembrance.

 

 

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New IHR research guide on Material Culture

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History through Material Culture

by Leonie Hannan and Sarah Longair

History through material culture is a unique, step-by-step guide for students and researchers who wish to use objects as historical sources. Responding to the significant scholarly interest in historical material culture studies, this book makes clear how students and researchers ready to use these rich material sources can make important, valuable and original contributions to history.

Written by two experienced museum practitioners and historians, the book recognises the theoretical and practical challenges of this approach and offers clear advice on methods to get the best out of material culture research. With a focus on the early modern and modern periods, this volume draws on examples from across the world and demonstrates how to use material culture to answer a range of enquiries, including social, economic, gender, cultural and global history.

Contents:

1 Approaches to the material world
2 Planning a research project
3 Developing a methodology
4 Locating sources: understanding museum collections and other repositories
5 Analysing sources
6 Writing up findings

Leonie Hannan is Research Fellow in Eighteenth-Century History at Queen’s University, Belfast
Sarah Longair is Lecturer in the History of Empire at the University of Lincoln

 

Price: £12.99, pbk.
ISBN: 978-1-7849-9126-5
Published: April 2017

Buy now

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New Historical Research articles

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“Recruiter Deserted,” an engraving by Georges Keating after George Morland and published by J. L. Smithers in 1791.

‘To become again our brethren’: desertion and community during the American Revolutionary War, 1775–83 by Jonathan Chandler

Desertion from active military service has always been a contentious action, especially in times of war. Deserters in the eighteenth century were routinely castigated as poor patriots or traitorous subjects. Recently, scholars have begun to analyse in greater depth how and why desertions occurred, and have demonstrated that political considerations were less important than issues of identity and interest. However, in the context of the American Revolutionary War, historians have focused on the relationship between deserters and the military, arguing that soldiers who left their posts were less integrated into the camp community. This article suggests that the act of desertion was often more than a protest against conditions or discipline, but instead was shaped by a deserter’s connections with civil society rather than the military community.

‘The Gallaunts of Fawey’: a case study of Fowey during the Hundred Years’ War, c.1337–1399, by S. J. Drake

This article explores the influence of the Hundred Years’ War on Fowey between c.1337 and 1399. In so doing, it employs naval pay rolls to study the contribution the town made to royal fleets and considers the mechanisms which the Crown employed to defend the port from enemy raids. It also examines the degree to which the war was extended though the agency of ‘pirates’. The article argues that the conflict had an all-pervasive effect upon Fowey, but that the costs incurred by the port and its people as a result of this were by no means crippling.

Detail from Bayeaux Tapestry, c.1070

In Anglo-Saxon courts, from the eighth century down to the Norman conquest, ‘officers of the mouth’, bore household titles and served the king and his guests during meals, at least on major occasions. Those butlers (pincernae) and dish-bearers (dapiferi, disciferi) were not mere ‘waiters’ but members of great aristocratic families; serving the king’s table was an honour for them, with all the implications of that word in an early medieval context. Using a variety of sources, particularly the subscription lists of charters, this article examines their rank at court, social origin, degree of proximity to kings and queens, and the nature of their occupation.

‘One of the best men of business we had ever met’: Thomas Drummond, the boundary commission and the 1832 Reform Act by Martin Spychal

As one of Britain’s landmark constitutional reforms, the 1832 Reform Act has attracted considerable historical attention. However, only cursory notice has been paid to the extensive work completed by the 1831–2 boundary commission to reform the nation’s parliamentary boundaries. Drawing on previously unused archival material, this article provides the first sustained analysis of the boundary reforms that took place in England’s ancient boroughs in 1832, revealing the significance of Thomas Drummond, a previously obscure royal engineer and chair of the English and Welsh boundary commission, to the ‘Great Reform Act’. As well as revealing the wider importance of parliamentary boundaries to the passage of reform by 1832, Drummond and the boundary commission established significant precedents for the expansion of the reformed British state and future parliamentary reform.

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New virtual issue of Historical Research celebrating women’s history month

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March 2017: Women Historians in Historical Research

Clio, muse of history, by Pierre Mignard

To celebrate Women’s History Month and tie in with the IHR and KCL event on London’s women historians (http://www.history.ac.uk/events/event/7709), we have brought together a selection of articles by women historians published in the journal since 2000. The collection includes academics at various stages of their careers – from eminent professors to early career researchers – and highlights the range and depth of women’s research interests. Articles are free to read throughout 2017.

Contents:

The power of images: the model universe of the First Emperor and its legacy. Jessica Rawson

Tenure and property in medieval England. Susan Reynolds

Episcopal emotions: tears in the life of the medieval bishop. Katherine Harvey

Licit medicine or ‘Pythagorean necromancy’? The ‘Sphere of Life and Death’ in late medieval England. Joanne Edge

Talk, script and print: the making of island books in early modern Venice. Anastasia Stouraiti

Faith, hope and money: the Jesuits and the genesis of fundraising for education. Olwen Hufton

Creole languages and their uses: the example of colonial Suriname. Natalie Zemon Davis

‘Britons, strike home’: politics, patriotism and popular song in British culture, c.1695–1900. Martha Vandrei

‘You know I am all on fire’: writing the adulterous affair in England, c.1740–1830. Sally Holloway

Language and empire, c.1800. Emma Rothschild

What difference did the vote make? Women in public and private life in Britain since 1918. Patricia M. Thane

Living beyond the barbed wire: the familial ties of British prisoners of war held in Europe during the Second World War.  Clare Makepeace

 

 

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New Historical Research article

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The Streatham portrait, believed to be a copy of a contemporary portrait of Lady Jane Grey

The 1553 succession crisis reconsidered. Paulina Kewes

This article offers a new perspective on the context and significance of the 1553 succession crisis precipitated by the Protestant Edward VI’s abortive bid to exclude his Catholic sister Mary in favour of his evangelical cousin Jane. Challenging the view of Jane’s coup as an evangelical crusade, and of Mary’s victory as the only successful Tudor rebellion, it analyses the constitutional principles behind the new settlement of succession, demonstrates how it was justified to the public and uncovers its Elizabethan legacy. By closely reading a series of key texts, it reshapes our understanding of this seminal event in Tudor history.

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Pollard Prize 2017

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Not the Pollard Prize

The Annual Pollard Prize – named in honour of the IHR’s founding director A. F. Pollard (1869-1948) – was established in 1999, initially as a termly prize for the best paper given at an IHR seminar by a postgraduate or early career researcher (within one year of obtaining the Ph.D). It has grown in popularity over the years with entries increasing in quality, quantity and variety. Papers cover subjects as extensive as our range of seminars.  Winners have written on travellers in Britain, colonial policemen, 18th-century footwear retailing, Foot and Mouth disease, saints’ cults and masculinity in the Nazi concentration camps, amongst many other topics. A list of early winners can be found here.

Early copy of the Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research (1924) announces fourteen IHR seminars. We now offer 74!

First prize is publication in the prestigious IHR journal, Historical Research, and £200 to spend on books from our publisher Wiley. A variable number of runner up prizes are awarded, depending on the quality of applications in any given year. Prizes are publication in the journal and a selection of Wiley books.

Entries are now being accepted for the 2017 prize. Papers should  be sent to julie.spraggon@sas.ac.uk with a supporting reference from a seminar convenor. The deadline for the prize is 26 May (papers scheduled to be given after that date but within the academic year may be submitted in advance). For more information see here.

 

 

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November issue of Historical Research

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Historical Research, vol. lxxxix, no 246220px-William_and_Mary

Contents:

‘A mission he bore – to Duke William he came’: Harold Godwineson’s Commentumand his covert ambitions. Ad F. J. van Kempen

The chronology of the de Mortemer family of Wigmore, c.1075–1185, and the consolidation of a Marcher lordship. Ian Mortimer

Magna Carta, canon law and pastoral care: excommunication and the church’s publication of the charter. Felicity G. Hill

The English parishes and knights’ fees tax of 1428: a study in fiscal politics and administration. Alex Brayson

‘Per peli e per segni’. Muster rolls, lists and notes: practical military records relating to the last Florentine ordinanze and militia, from Machiavelli to the fall of the Republic (1506–30). Andrea Guidi

Penitence, preachers and politics 1533–47: Thomas Cranmer’s influence on church teaching on penance during the Henrician Reformation. Eric Bramhall

Memories of violence and New English identities in early modern Ireland. Joan Redmond [OPEN ACCESS]

An inflammatory match? Public anxiety and political assurance at the wedding of William III and Mary II. Catriona Murray

Lord Kames’s analysis of the natural origins of religion: the Essays on the Principles of Morality and Natural Religion (1751). R. J. W. Mills

‘We have to compliment the Aristocracy on the exhibition of their morals’: the Ellenborough divorce case (1830) and the politics of scandal in pre-reform London and Vormärz Vienna. Greet De Bock

War, religion and anti-slavery ideology: Isaac Nelson’s radical abolitionist examination of the American civil war. Daniel Ritchie

British humanitarianism and the Russian famine, 1891–2. Luke Kelly

A man called Mahaffy: an Irish cosmopolitan confronts crisis, 1899–1919. Tomás Irish

Combined operations and British strategy, 1900–9. Shawn Grimes

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Historical Research – new articles online

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exclusionThat racial chasm that yawns eternally in our midst’: the British empire and the politics of Asian migration, 1900–14 by Cornelis Heere

In recent years, the study of the networks, ideas and identities that bound the ‘British world’ together has proved a rich field of enquiry in imperial history. This article seeks to apply those insights to an issue that dominated much of Britain’s relations with its settler colonies before the First World War: the controversies surrounding the exclusion of Asian migrants. Racial exclusion has garnered a great deal of scholarly attention in recent years. This article builds on that historiography, but also questions its inattention to the British connection, and hence to considerations of imperial power. It analyses how the debate on immigration served as a canvas on which advocates and detractors of exclusion could paint competing concepts of empire, and seeks to understand how policymakers attempted to manage the migration question through a range of spatial and diplomatic solutions. It will attempt, in sum, to show how a global empire dealt with the problems of a world that seemed increasingly divided along racial lines.

A man called Mahaffy: an Irish cosmopolitan confronts crisis, 1899–1919 by Tomás Irish

This article examines the last twenty years of the life of one of Ireland’s most controversial scholars, the polymath John Pentland Mahaffy. Mahaffy’s name still has wide resonance in Irish historiography owing to his interventions in Irish cultural politics in the decades before 1919. He is frequently seen as an ‘anti-Irish’ figure. This article places Mahaffy in the wider context of international scholarship of the late Victorian era, arguing that he was a cosmopolitan whose overriding concern was not Ireland, or even Britain, but the fracturing of the republic of letters.

‘Per peli e per segni’. Muster rolls, lists and notes: practical military records relating to the last Florentine ordinanze and militia, from Machiavelli to the fall of the Republic (1506–30) by Andrea Guidi

In Renaissance Florence, the militia force created by Machiavelli in 1506, then re-established in 1527–30, involved the production of two types of records: the low-level ‘practical’ records which documented the daily running of an army in the field, such as muster rolls, notes and lists; and the upper-level administrative records, such as the correspondence between governing bodies and military officers. An analysis of published and unpublished sources provides evidence of the importance of such documentary practices, and highlights the problems connected to the loss and preservation of low-level military records relating to Renaissance ordinanze and militia.

The chronology of the de Mortemer family of Wigmore, c.1075–1185, and the consolidation of a Marcher lordship by Ian Mortimer

The twelfth-century chronology of the de Mortemer (later Mortimer) family of Wigmore has proved a difficult and confusing subject. In particular, most scholars have accepted the Complete Peerage genealogy, which incorrectly posits the existence of two distinct lords called Hugh between 1104 and 1181. Here, the English sources are reconsidered alongside independent Norman evidence, resulting in a more robust genealogy and a better context for understanding how the de Mortemers shifted their position from being primarily a Norman family with English and Welsh interests (which they neglected) to being primarily an English one with Norman and Welsh responsibilities (which they did not).

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