The IHR Blog |

History Day 2015: After the event

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History-day-1The IHR and Senate House Library ran a second History Libraries and Research Open Day in January 2015. This brought researchers together with professional staff from a wide range of library and archive collections. It was a fantastic day and it was great to see so many libraries, archives and researchers there. We had very positive feedback from attenders and participating organisations alike.

History-day-2 Speakers gave a range of fascinating talks about how to get the most out of libraries, archives and digital resources. You can read about the day in tweets on the Storify page. An associated website continues to be updated with information about library and archive collections along with podcasts and blog posts from speakers: http://historycollections.blogs.sas.ac.uk.

 

 

New reviews: Trust, Italian Army, British India and Colonial Boston

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hoskingWe kick off this week with Geoffrey Hosking’s Trust: A History, with Eric M. Uslaner and the author disagreeing over this key issue (no. 1729, with response here).

Next up is The Italian Army and the First World War by John Gooch. Mario Draper reviews a book which will almost certainly remain a seminal text for scholars of the period and anyone else interested in European military history (no. 1728).

Then we turn to G. J. Bryant’s The Emergence of British Power in India, 1600-1784: A Grand Strategic Interpretation, and James Lees finds this book to be a refreshing addition to the historiography (no. 1727).

Finally we have Robert Love’s Warnings: Searching for Strangers in Colonial Boston by Cornelia Hughes Dayton and Sharon Salinger. Kristin O’Brassill-Kulfan believes this research fills an important gap in the on-the-ground history of pre-industrial poverty in the United States (no. 1726).

New Historical Research articles

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red cross

Humanitarian assistance during the Rif War (Morocco, 1921–6): the International Committee of the Red Cross and ‘an unfortunate affair by Pablo La Porte

This article focuses on the role of the International Committee of the Red Cross (I.C.R.C.) in the Rif War (Morocco, 1921–6) and places humanitarian action in three inter-related contexts: the complexity of the international scenario after the First World War, the institutional architecture of the Red Cross and the developments in international humanitarian law. Challenging simplistic approaches to an otherwise historically overlooked affair, the article argues that the rather undignified role of the I.C.R.C. during the conflict was a result both of Eurocentric assumptions and international manipulation.

Liberal Unionism and political representation in Wales, c.1886–1893 by Naomi Lloyd-Jones

This article reassesses the history of Liberal Unionism in Wales and the impact the Irish Home Rule crisis had on constituency politics. Liberal associations played a crucial role in the revolt against ‘dissentient’ M.P.s, whom they charged with ‘misrepresenting’ constituency opinion (as articulated by the ‘caucus’). This damaged Liberal Unionism irreparably, and the party failed to build a viable organizational machinery that could beat the Liberals at their own game. Yet this study of failure tells us much about attitudes toward representation and illustrates the importance of a grass-roots approach to a vital period in Welsh and British political history

 

 

 

 

 

 

New reviews: John Wyclif, Medieval space, Cypriot communists and labour and liberalism

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1280px-Wycliffecollege_toronto_chapel1We start this week with John Wyclif on War and Peace by Rory Cox. Christopher Allmand and the reviewer discuss a work which places Wyclif in a long historical context (no. 1725, with response here).

Then we turn to Space in the Medieval West: Places, Territories, and Imagined Geographies, edited by Meredith Cohen and Fanny Madeline. Sarah Ann Milne recommends a book which serves to substantiate and complement existing studies whilst offering a number of fascinating new explorations (no. 1724).

Next up is Yiannakis Kolokasidis’s History of the Communist Party in Cyprus: Colonialism, Class and the Cypriot Left, which Alexios Alecou finds to be an original contribution, rich with theoretical insights and practical implications (no. 1723).

Finally we turn to Labour and the Caucus: Working-Class Radicalism and Organised Liberalism in England, 1868-1888 by James Owen. Jules Gehrke believes this book is sure to become a valued part of the scholarly conversation (no. 1722).

New Historical Research article online

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policeLocal initiative, central oversight, provincial perspective: governing police forces in nineteenth-century Leeds by David Churchill

This article examines police administration as a branch of urban government, based on a case study of Leeds between 1815 and 1900. Making extensive use of local government and police records, it takes a longer-term view of ‘reform’ than most existing studies, and privileges the more routine aspects of everyday governance. It thus provides an original exploration of central-local government relations, as well as conflict and negotiation between distinct bodies of self-government within the locality. Previous studies have rightly emphasized that urban police governance was primarily a local responsibility, yet this article also stresses the influence of central state oversight and an extra-local, provincial perspective, both of which modified the grip of localism on nineteenth-century government.

New reviews: Eurasian Borderlands, peace, early American wars, Reformation

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eurasia-map-oldWe start with The Struggle for the Eurasian Borderlands: From the Rise of Early Modern Empires to the End of the First World War by Alfred Rieber. Simone Pelizza and the author discuss a book which is destined to be an indispensable reference work for both students and researchers for many years to come (no. 1721, with response here).

Next up is William Mulligan’s The Great War for Peace. Cyril Pearce reviews a significant, if flawed, contribution to the debate about the impact of the First World War (no. 1720).

Then we have the Encyclopedia of the Wars of the Early American Republic, 1783-1812: A Political, Social, and Military History, edited by Spencer C. Tucker, which Jonathan Chandler believes this encyclopedia will be a welcome addition to the shelves of any library (no. 1719).

Finally we turn to Reformation Unbound: Protestant Visions of Reform in England, 1525–1590 by Karl Gunther. Donald McKim finds this to be a splendid study which clearly delineates the various Protestant visions of reform in England (no. 1718).

Hakluyt Society Publications now on open access.

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The library would just like to inform its readers that the Hakluyt Society Publications are now once more available on open access and can be found on the second floor of the IHR library in the north-east corner of the main reading room beside the Dutch collection.

Juan Luis Vives and Thomas More: Humanism and Anglo-Spanish Cultural Relations in the Sixteenth Century

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Vives & MoroThe lives and interactions between Juan Luis Vives and Thomas More

Friday 13th February 2015, 10.00 am – 6.00 pm
Wolfson Conference Suite, Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, London

Registration is open for this day conference, supported by the Spanish Embassy in London.  The conference coincides with a major exhibition in Valencia on the lives and the interactions between two central figures in English and Spanish life in the early sixteenth century, the humanists Sir Thomas More and Juan Luis Vives.

More was successively a lawyer, MP, councillor to Henry VIII, and Lord Chancellor whose opposition to the English Reformation led to his execution for treason. Vives, born in Valencia into a Jewish  family which had suffered at the hands of the Inquisition, came to  England in the 1520s to be tutor to Princess Mary (later Queen Mary  Tudor), and resided for some time in Oxford. He wrote extensively on psychology, medicine and education. The two men shared opinions, outlooks and approaches and Vives spent time at More’s home in Chelsea in 1526. This conference will examine their friendship and collaboration in the wider context of sixteenth-century humanism and Anglo-Spanish relations.

Speakers for the event include:

Prof. Eamon Duffy, Magdalene College, Cambridge
Prof. Glyn Redworth, University of Oxford
Prof. Rosa Vidal Doval, Queen Mary University, London
Prof. Bethany Aram, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Seville
Professor Enrique Garcia Hernan, Institute of History, Spanish National Research Council
Prof. Igor Pérez Tostado, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Seville

Registration:

Full Fee: £20
Student: £10

Registrations for the conference can be made online or by requesting a registration form from the Events office. The Registration fee will include attendance, tea/coffee and lunch.

Latest issue of Historical Research – Feb 2015 (vol. 88, no. 239)

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promenading2Articles

Intelligence and intrigue in the March of Wales: noblewomen and the fall of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, 1274–82. Emma Cavell

Famine is not the problem: a historical perspective. Cormac Ó Gráda

False traitors or worthy knights? Treason and rebellion against Edward II in the Scalacronica and the Anglo-Norman prose Brut chronicles. Andy King

Radical Geneva? The publication of Knox’s First Blast of the Trumpet and Goodman’s How Superior Powers Oght to be Obeyd in context. Charlotte Panofre

The rise of the promeneur: walking the city in eighteenth-century Paris. Laurent Turcot

Black people and the criminal justice system: prejudice and practice in later eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century London. Peter King and John Carter Wood

Moral economies and the cold chain. Susanne Freidberg

Eugenics, socialism and artificial insemination: the public career of Herbert Brewer. David Redvaldsen

Can we conquer unemployment? The Liberal party, public works and the 1931 political crisis. Peter Sloman

Notes and Documents

Lord Burghley’s ‘Ten precepts’ for his son, Robert Cecil: a new date and interpretation. Fred B. Tromly

New reviews: Lincoln and Latin America, English clergy, Louis XIV and the Indian Army

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lincolndouglasWe start this week with Slavery, Race and Conquest in the Tropics : Lincoln, Douglas, and the Future of Latin America by Robert E. May. Phillip Magness and the author debate a book which gives us a Civil War that was both the product of international affairs, and a shaping force on their subsequent course (no. 1717, with response here).

Then we turn to Hugh M. Thomas’s The Secular Clergy in England, 1066-1216, and Katherine Harvey and the author discuss a book which is surely destined to become one of the definitive works in the field for many years to come (no. 1716, with response here).

Next up is Status Interaction During the Reign of Louis XIV by Giora Sternberg. Linda Kiernan believes this book presents historians of the court with a vigorous model to test (no. 1715).

Finally we have George Morton-Jack’s The Indian Army on the Western Front: India’s Expeditionary Force to France and Belgium in the First World War. Adam Prime finds this to be an extremely stimulating book, which should appeal to academics and enthusiasts alike (no. 1714).

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