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New Historical Research article online

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220px-A_Chronicle_of_England_-_Page_251_-_Death_of_de_MontfortTwo oaths of the community in 1258 by Joshua Hey

This article looks at two ‘oaths of the community’ of 1258. First, it shows that the oath of the community at Oxford has been widely misinterpreted by historians: it was an oath of mutual aid, not an oath binding the community to reform. Second, it looks at the order for all in the realm to take an oath in October 1258, which has never been fully examined before. This order aimed to bind the entire realm to the reform movement – it was proclaimed in Latin, French and English – yet no chroniclers mentioned it and no mechanism was provided for its enactment.

New Historical Research article

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1926-frigidaire-electric-fridge

Susan Freidberg’s Anglo-American paper on ‘Moral ecomonies and the cold chain’ now published online.

 

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the spread of what we now know as the cold chain sparked controversy in both Europe and North America. This article examines popular distrust of early refrigerated transport and storage in light of larger debates about how best to procure good food at a fair price. Expanding on E. P. Thompson’s concept of moral economy, the article shows that refrigeration proved controversial not simply because it helped de-localize and industrialize food supply. It also challenged norms that had previously governed trade in perishables, especially those concerning transparency, naturalness and freshness.

August issue of Historical Research (vol. lxxxvii, no. 237)

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Articles:feast

‘You are what you eat’: historical changes in ideas about food and identity. Steven Shapin

Earl Gilbert Marshal and his mortal enemies. David Crouch

Provincial news networks in late Elizabethan Devon. Ian Cooper

Female barrenness, bodily access and aromatic treatments in seventeenth-century England. Jennifer Evans

Rethinking church and state during the English Interregnum. Charles W. A. Prior

A considerable portion of the defence of the Empire’: Lisbon and victualling the royal navy during the French Revolutionary War, 1793–1802. Martin Robson

Prelude to the Opium War? British reactions to the ‘Napier Fizzle’ and attitudes towards China in the mid eighteen-thirties. GAO Hao

The Red Book of the Exchequer: a curious affair revisited. Margaret Procter

Imperialism first, the war second: the British, an Armenian legion, and deliberations on where to attack the Ottoman empire, November 1914–April 1915. Andrekos Varnava

‘M4 to Wales – and prosper!’ A history of a motorway. Martin Johnes

Notes and Documents:

Letters of Richard II (1397–8) in the authorship of William Ferriby. David R. Carlson

BBIH and History Day

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My colleagues in the library have already blogged about History Day, however I thought I’d follow it up from the perspective of the Bibliography of British and Irish History  (BBIH) as I’ve had a number of enquiries which I can address here.

After an outline of the history of the Bibliography and its coverage I usually emphasise three points:-

1.  The Bibliography has links (where possible and where institutional subscriptions allow) to a variety of sources including to full text via doi (digital object identifier);  online collections of journals such as JSTOR and Project Muse; links to publishers;  and links to  other digital resources such as the National Register of Archives and union catalogues (e.g. Copac).

History Day 2014

2. The ability to set up email alerts for specific subjects or authors or places (or a combination).  Users can easily set up an email alert by following the instructions. The email alerts can then be managed by clicking on the “My email alerts” on the banner of the homepage. It’s a simple and effective way of keeping informed about developments in your research area (you’ll get an update three times per year). As an example I have an email alert for subject keyword “Intelligence” and period covered “1880-1945”.

FireShot Screen Capture #026 - 'Brepolis_ BBIH' - apps_brepolis_net_bbih_search_cfm

3. The ability to export data to a range of reference tools, such as Microsoft Word, RefWorks, Endnote and Zotero.  Again there are online tutorials for demonstrating how to use these tools.

FireShot Screen Capture #027 - 'Brepolis_ BBIH' - apps_brepolis_net_bbih_search_cfm_action=search_advanced_export_all&startrow=1&endrow=1007&search_order=year_desc&ACCESS=restricted OR public&FULL_TEXT=victor&P

Additionally from History Day, some useful tips were picked up from Paul Horsler (LSE) who discussed reference tools.  He also made three key points. Use the reference manager as you start your research, you’ll become accustomed to it sooner and it will save a lot of time at the end of research. Choose a tool you feel comfortable with and one that is supported by your research institution (if in doubt, ask your librarian). And finally, as with all software, make sure you do backups – you don’t want to lose all that research.

Royal Commission on Historical Monuments: Huntingdonshire

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Last year British History Online published the complete series of the Royal Commission on Historical Monuments, England. To introduce these volumes for readers who may not be familiar with the RCHME, we asked a number of experts to write introductions to particular counties. Here Charles O’Brien, one of the general editors of the revised Pevsner series from Yale University Press introduces the Huntingdonshire volume. Charles revised the volume Bedfordshire, Huntingdonshire and Peterborough (forthcoming), so is the ideal person to put RCHME, Hunts in context. Charles writes:

 

Huntingdonshire was one of the smallest counties of England. In 1965 it was merged with the Soke of Peterborough as a new county but both were abolished in 1974 and absorbed into the newly reconstituted county of Cambridgeshire. Huntingdonshire’s identity is preserved as a district within Cambridgeshire but appreciation of local architectural identity is easily lost and so historians should still value the coverage given to it in one of the earliest RCHME inventories, published in 1926.

 

Nikolaus Pevsner, in his survey of Huntingdonshire for the Buildings of England series (1st ed. 1968) relied heavily on the Commission’s inventory while admitting ‘I am only too well aware of the inadequacies of my gazetteer. Anyone who studies the volume [of the RCHM] can see for himself how many timber-framed houses, how many staircases, how many domestic fitments are left, and guess from that how much more is missing for the C18 which the Royal Commission at the time …did not include’. Pevsner’s copy of the volume remains in the Pevsner Architectural Guides office at Yale University Press, and throughout the volume are his minute annotations and strikings out, indicating that the RCHME volume was in his hands as he carried out his visits during the spring of 1967.

plate 164

Staircase at Stibbington Hall, 1625

 

A notable contribution to the Hutingdonshire volume was provided by Sidney Inskip Ladds (1867-1950), architect and local historian who became one of the authors for the three volumes of the Victoria History of the Counties of England (1926-1936). Ladds came from a local family, his grandfather was rector of Ellington, one of the many stone churches with a tall Perp spire for which Huntingdonshire is, or should be, well-known, and his father John Ladds was also an architect, with a modest living from church restorations in the later years of his life, an area of practise which would dominate Sidney’s working life. Partly as a consequence of his church work Ladds accumulated a very considerable body of knowledge of Huntingdonshire’s buildings and his voluminous files of scraps of paper recording his observations, names of architects, genealogy, recollections of incumbents and others are lodged at the Norris Museum, St Ives. Much of his close interest in buildings of every period is reflected in the coverage of the VCH volumes and clearly expressed in the RCHME inventory.

 

At least part of the pleasure to be taken from the RCHME volumes of the earlier period is in making comparisons between the photographs with the present day, especially the village scenes with their car-less and thus immensely spacious streets but also in the general character of the vernacular buildings of the locality many of which have been significantly altered since the early C20, if not demolished. Others are pleasantly unchanged (the interior of the Lion Hotel, Buckden of c.1500 is an example) and for churches and major houses there is little to record in the way of loss. Only a small proportion of the county’s buildings recorded by photos in the volume have disappeared, notably Conington Castle, but among the timber-framed buildings there had even by the 1960s been a higher rate of attrition and one will search in vain for some of the houses recorded in the plates section of the volume or at least deplore the often insensitive restoration to which they were later subjected, e.g. a seventeenth-century house at Offord Cluny (plate 102) which is now hardly recognisable.

 

Historical Research – new articles published online

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Royal 10 E.IV, f.18v

Intelligence and intrigue in the March of Wales: noblewomen and the fall of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, 1274–82 by Emma Cavell

Licit medicine or ‘Pythagorean necromancy’? The ‘Sphere of Life and Death’ in late medieval England
by Joanne Edge

The Elizabethan succession question in Roger Edwardes’s ‘Castra Regia’ (1569) and ‘Cista Pacis Anglie’ (1576) by Victoria Smith

A considerable portion of the defence of the Empire’: Lisbon and victualling the royal navy during the French Revolutionary War, 1793–1802 by Martin Robson

Provincial news networks in late Elizabethan Devon by Ian Cooper