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Reviews in History


New reviews: French in London, employees, the Irish Question and food supply

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cornickI’m always receptive to feedback (this is the sort of foolish statement that unleashes a barrage of abuse and ends with me weeping in a corner), and as a sharp-eyed reader had pointed out a couple of weeks ago that all the reviews we’d published that week had (co-incidentally) been on British history, I just wondered whether anyone else had suggestions for areas we don’t cover as much as we ought? Don’t think I won’t notice if it turns out that the gaps in our coverage can only really be filled by reviews of your own forthcoming masterpieces…

Do get in touch at danny.millum@sas.ac.uk.

Anyway, on with the reviews, and our featured book this week is A History of the French in London: Liberty, Equality, Opportunity, edited by Martyn Cornick and Debra Kelly. Antoine Capet believes this new collection would make an ideal gift for a member of the age-old ‘French Colony’ in London (no. 1574).

VinelThen we turn to Jean-Christian Vinel’s The Employee: A Political History, which Jefferson Cowie believes invigorates the stale paradigms of labor history and brings new perspectives and intellectual energy to the subject (no. 1573).

simNext up is A Union Forever: The Irish Question and U.S. Foreign Relations in the Victorian Age by David Sim. Andre Fleche and the author discuss a work which will prove essential to understanding how American statesmen dealt with the complex problems raised by the ‘Irish question’ (no. 1572, with response here).

thoenFinally James Davis believes  Food Supply, Demand and Trade: Aspects of the Economic Relationship between Town and Countryside (eds. Piet van Cruijningen, Erik Thoen) adds to the important debates on pre-industrial town-country relations and provides much food for thought (no. 1571).

New reviews: Paper war, Ford Foundation, British colonialism and Ignacio de Loyola

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eatonWe’re a little bit rushed in the IHR Digital office today, as me and my esteemed colleague Jonathan Blaney of BHO fame are giving talks this afternoon to visiting students from Northwestern University. It’s always an intimidating experience being on the same bill as Jonathan, but more than ever this week, as after a triumphant appearance at the Research Libraries and Research Open Day his twitter-stream was deluged with ‘Agree with Blaney’ comments. He’s now had this inscribed on a sign above his desk, and the rest of us are starting to worry…

‘I agree with Blaney’

Anyway, on to the reviews, and we begin with The Anglo-American Paper War: Debates about the New Republic, 1800–1825 by Joseph Eaton. Thomas Rodgers and the author discuss a study which firmly locates the development of the United States in its international context (no. 1570, with response here).

ferguson_0Then we turn to Top Down: the Ford Foundation, Black Power and the Reinvention of Racial Liberalism by Karen Ferguson. Fabio Rojas recommends an account that clearly situates the Ford Foundation’s position in mid 20th-century social politics (no. 1569).

greeneNext up is Jack P. Greene’s Evaluating Empire and Confronting Colonialism in Eighteenth-Century Britain, as Daniel Clinkman assesses a book that probes an important question about the relationship between the imperial centre and peripheries (no. 1568).

loyolaFinally Megan Armstrong believes that Ignacio de Loyola by Enrique García Hernán proves that Loyola is one of those historic figures that bears repeated examination (no. 1567).

New reviews: Britishness, chaplains, the occult and the black market

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‘Never been to Oxford?! Where have you been living your life?’

Safely back from my trip to the dreaming spires, where I had a very receptive / indulgent audience at  the Oxford e-Research Centre. Maybe I’ve already bored regular readers with this before, but wandering round the colleges afterwards I was reminded of my first visit there, a few years back, to interview a very eminent historian. When we met, I told him I’d arrived early to have a look round, as I’d never been before. His astonished response was: ‘Never been to Oxford?! Where have you been living your life?’

kushnerAnyway, enough of such reminiscences, and on with serious matters. Our featured review this week is of The Battle of Britishness: Migrant Journeys, 1685 to the Present by Tony Kushner. Laurence Brown and the author discuss a book which poses a profound challenge to not only historians, but also contemporary policy-makers and museum practitioners (no. 1566, with response here).

LockwoodThen we turn to Chaplains in Early Modern England: Patronage, Literature and Religion, edited by Hugh Adlington, Tom Lockwood and Gillian Wright. Nicholas Cranfield enjoys ten thought-provoking essays, which suggest the need to further research the ministry of the Church of England (no. 1565).

monodNext up is Paul Kleber Monod’s Solomon’s Secret Arts: the Occult in the Age of Enlightenment, which Peter Elmer believes lays impressive foundations for anyone wishing to engage with the broad appeal of occult thinking in England between 1650 and 1800 (no. 1564).

roodhouseFinally, Jamie Stoops reviews a dense and well-researched investigation of the ‘moral economy’ of Britain’s wartime and post-war white, grey, and black markets, Black Market: Britain 1939-1955 by Mark Roodhouse (no. 1563).

New reviews: Virginia governors, American eugenics, religion & economics and medieval Rouen

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corbettBefore I forget / get distracted, my colleagues at British History Online have asked me to bring this opportunity to your attention (http://www.history.ac.uk/news/2014-03-12/academic-advisory-board-member-british-history-online) – have a look, and if you fancy getting involved as an Academic Advisory Board member then either reply to british-history@sas.ac.uk OR feel free to drop me a line.

On a much more trivial note, I have been invited to take part in the Future of Editing seminar, and will be in Oxford tomorrow at lunchtime talking about Reviews if anyone of you are free and interested. Full details are here (http://bdlssblog.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/), but please don’t look at the poster too closely, except as a warning against taking selfies in the dark…

Ok, finally, back to what you actually signed up for, and this week we’ve got a nice varied crop for you. First up is James Corbett David’s Dunmore’s New World: The Extraordinary Life of a Royal Governor in Revolutionary America, as Stephen Conway reviews a book which seeks to introduce us to a Dunmore who was more than a controversial governor of Virginia (no. 1562, with response here).

obrien (1)Then Erika Dyck hails a welcome addition to the growing field of literature on the history of eugenics, as she takes on Framing the Moron: the Social Construction of Feeble-Mindedness in the American Eugenic Era by Gerald V. O’Brien (no. 1561, with response here).

WaddellNext up is God, Duty and Community in English Economic Life, 1660-1720 by Brodie Waddell. Jennifer Bishop believes that by eloquently challenging older assumptions, and arguing for a more nuanced approach, this book stands as a useful introduction to the vibrancy of economic life in early modern England (no. 1560).

HicksFinally we have Leonie Hicks and Elma Brenner’s edited collection Society and Culture in Medieval Rouen, 911-1300 which Benjamin Pohl praises as being a well-structured volume which is both informative and innovative in its approach (no. 1559).

New reviews: Anti-Judaism, American theology, US-Habsburg relations and advertising

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nirenbergAll manner of excitement last week at the IHR, with the prestigious Gerald Aylmer Seminar receiving a number of uninvited guests, as student protestors were diverted from their occupation of the Vice-Chancellor’s offices by the lure of the post-seminar sandwiches. The stern intervention of our events officer saw them off, but I think there’s a lesson here for any university seeking to deal with unwelcome demonstrations – no matter how righteous the cause, students will always prioritise free food…

Back to more serious matters, and this week’s reviews. We begin with Anti-Judaism: The Western Tradition by David Nirenberg, which Christopher Smith believes represents a scholarly feat few writers could hope to match, engagingly tracking the history of how influential thinkers negatively interpreted Judaism to better understand their own religions and society (no. 1558).

aubert (1)Then we turn to Annette Aubert’s The German Roots of Nineteenth-Century American Theology. Daniel Ritchie and the author discuss a work which should be eagerly read by all modern religious historians with an interest in the development of Reformed theology in the United States (no. 1557, with response here).

phelpsNext up is Sovereignty Transformed: U.S.-Habsburg Relations from 1815 to the Paris Peace Conference by Nicole M. Phelps, found by Stephen Tuffnell to be a highly calibrated examination worthy of a place on the shelves of European and American historians alike (no. 1556).

nixonFinally Peter Gurney reviews Hard Sell: Advertising, Affluence and Transatlantic Relations, c1951-69 by Sean Nixon. His view is that despite its valuable insights in the end this book, like many of the commodities it considers, promises more than it delivers (no. 1555).

 

New reviews: Scotland, flappers, slave trade and queens

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FryWith each week seeing a new series of claims and counter-claims about the viability of an independent Scotland, now seems an appropriate time for us to review a new book by Michael Fry, a self-declared former Scottish Conservative now supporting the nationalist position. Ian Donnachie believes A New Race of Men: Scotland 1815-1914 is in the tradition of scholarly, thoughtful, popular history and seems likely to command a wide audience (no. 1552).

bland (1)Elsewhere, Eloise Moss and Lucy Bland discuss Modern Women on Trial: Sexual Transgression in the Age of the Flapper which shows how the historiography on women’s sexuality in inter-war Britain has progressed during the last two decades (no. 1554, with response here).

walvinThen we turn to Crossings: Africa, the Americas and the Atlantic Slave Trade by James Walvin, which Matthew Mitchell finds a highly coherent account that nevertheless manages to convey a satisfyingly complex view of its subject (no. 1553).

BeemFinally Estelle Paranque thinks that the strength of The Name of a Queen: William Fleetwood’s Itinerarium ad Windsor by Charles Beem and Dennis Moore is that it highlights and encapsulates the concerns and hopes that represented the power of a queen during the early modern period (no. 1551).

New reviews: Banishment, broadcasting, China vs Japan and global intellectual history

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MorganYour deputy editor has returned this week from an ill-fated long weekend in Dorset, where apocalyptic weather conditions turned the drive from London into an eight-hour odyssey, and filled (we saw at least two) the fields with dead cows. And I didn’t get my promised Dorset Knobs and Vinney…

Still, my suffering pales into comparison with that endured by the subjects of our featured book, Banishment in the Early Atlantic World: Convicts, Rebels and Slaves, by Gwenda Morgan, Peter Rushton. Aaron Fogleman and the authors discuss a book full of highlights, and which raises a number of valuable questions for future study (no. 1550, with response here).

potter (1)Next up, we have Simon Potter’s Broadcasting Empire: The BBC and the British World, 1922-1970, as Brett Bebber reviews a staggering achievement, worthy of attention by scholars of popular culture and British imperialism, in addition to those interested in the business of radio and television (no. 1549).

mitterThen we turn to China’s War with Japan, 1937-1945: The Struggle for Survival by Rana Mitter. For Aaron Moore, this book provides a powerful, readable, and accessible account of the conflict in China (no. 1548).

MoynFinally Julia McClure believes that Global Intellectual History (edited by Samuel Moyn and Andrew Sartori) contributes to the development of global history by deepening our awareness of the politics, epistemologies, and pluralities of global concepts (no. 1547).

 

New reviews: Heresy, revisionism, modernity and infanticide

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mooreA real treat for medievalists this week, as eminent academics Pete Biller and R. I. Moore engage in a full and frank discussion of the latter’s The War on Heresy: Faith and Power in Medieval Europe – a must-read! (no. 1546, with response here).

warringtonNext up, we have Revisionist Histories by Marnie Hughes-Warrington, which Jamie Melrose believes contains a wealth of examples of history’s plasticity, without outlining any means to establish the rules of these morphing games (no. 1545, with response here).

kynastonThen we turn to David Kynaston’s Modernity Britain: Opening the Box, 1957-1959. Malin Dahlstrom thinks that while readable, this volume fails to justify the author’s claim that the period in question marked a turning point in post-war British history (no. 1544).

farrellFinally Ian Miller praises a meticulously researched, well-written and thoughtfully crafted account of infanticide in late 19th-century Ireland, as he reviews ‘A most diabolical deed’: Infanticide and Irish society, 1850–1900 by Elaine Farrell (no. 1543).

New reviews: Churchill’s speeches, universities & empire, Baal’s priests and English love

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toyeMuch discussion today of the trustworthiness, of lack thereof, of different names. In the interest of not alienating sections of our readership, I will have to redact our conclusions, but I would be interested to find out if readers share our irrational prejudices…

Anyway, enough of these witterings, and on with some reviews written by people with very sensible names.

First up, The Roar of the Lion: The Untold Story of Churchill’s World War II Speeches by Richard Toye. Kevin Matthews and the author discuss a valuable addition to the study of Churchill’s wartime premiership (no. 1542).

pietschThen we have Tamson Pietsch’s Empire of Scholars: Universities, Networks and the British Academic World, 1850-1939. Barbara Bush finds this book succeeds in its aim of writing settler universities into the history of British academia (no. 1541).

mccallNext up is Baal’s Priests: The Loyalist Clergy and the English Revolution, by Fiona McCall, and James Mawdesley believes that while the author has done a great service to historians of the 17th century in highlighting the treasures of the Walker archive, this book is not the final word (no. 1540).

langhamerFinally, we have Claire Langhamer’s The English in Love: The Intimate Story of an Emotional Revolution. Sally Holloway reviews a hotly anticipated new book, part of a new wave of scholarship on romantic love (no. 1539).

New reviews: Imperial electors, 1970s Ireland, League of Nations and Nazi culture

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wolfThanks to everyone who got back to me about the podcast last week – we’ve already got plans to do more of these, and, as I said, it would be great to have suggestions for suitable interviewees. Do also feel free to get in touch if you fancy yourself, Paxman-like, on the other side of the mike…

Anyway, on with this week’s reviews, and we start with Armin Wolf’s Verwandtschaft – Erbrecht – Königswahlen. Donald Jackman appraises an attempt to solve the enigma of the origin of the imperial college of electors (no. 1538).

 

ferriterThen we have Ambiguous Republic: Ireland in the 1970s, Diarmaid Ferriter, which Shane Nagle praises as a monumental piece of scholarship that will be a – if not the – standard work on Ireland in the 1970s for many years to come, written by one of Ireland’s premier historians working today (no. 1537).

 

clavinNext Emily Baughan believes Securing the World Economy. The Reinvention of the League of Nations, 1920-1946 by Patricia Clavin deserves an audience beyond the academy (no. 1536).

 

dennisFinally we have David B. Dennis’s Inhumanities. Nazi Interpretations of Western Culture, which Helen Roche reviews as a work which demands serious attention (no. 1535).

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