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Reviews in History

New reviews: Medieval romance, Brits and apartheid, Puritans and Democrats


random34We start this week with Michael Johnston’s Romance and the Gentry in Late Medieval England, as Katie Bridger and the author discuss an insightful, fascinating contribution to our understanding of the world of the gentry (no. 1859, with response here).

Then we have a great interview by Jordan Landes with Elizabeth Williams, talking about her most recent book, The Politics of Race in Britain and South Africa, which examines British support for the anti-apartheid movement among its own black communities (no. 1858).

Next is The Crisis of British Protestantism: Church Power in the Puritan Revolution, 1638–44 by Hunter Powell. James Mawdesley praises a fine work of scholarship, which will surely become essential reading for those investigating the religious politics of the British Isles at a critical moment in their histories (no. 1857).

Finally we have Lily Geismer’s Don’t Blame Us: Suburban Liberals and the Transformation of the Democratic Party, and Patrick Andelic believes this timely, original and richly detailed book should be required reading for all those seeking to understand the modern Democratic Party (no. 1856).

New reviews: Henrykow Book, C18 satirical prints, Nixon and Europe, origins of Europe


henrykowWe start with The Text and the World: The Henryków Book, Its Authors, and their Region, 1160-1310 by Piotr S. Gorecki. Shami Ghosh and the author discuss a work which succeeds magnificently in providing a history of a European monastic institution that serves as an example of European history within a larger, overarching framework (no. 1855, with response here).

Next up is John Richard Moores’ Representations of France in English Satirical Prints 1740-1832, and James Baker finds much to recommend in this lively volume (no. 1854).

We then turn to Richard Nixon and Europe: The Reshaping of the Postwar Atlantic World by Luke A. Nichter. Robert Ledger believes this to be an excellent study of the transatlantic relationship during this period and a fine addition to the historiography of the Nixon Presidency (no. 1853, with response here).

Finally we have a review article on the origins of the landscape of Paris by Anthony Nardini, covering Planning the Greenspaces of Nineteenth-Century Paris by Richard S. Hopkins and How Paris Became Paris: The Invention of the Modern City by Joan DeJean (no. 1852).

New reviews: Orthodox Church, Jefferson, Cuba, medieval textiles and Galileo revisited


Gentile_Bellini_003We begin with a response by Christopher Black to an earlier review of Thomas Mayer’s The Roman Inquisition: Trying Galileo.

We then turn to Render unto the Sultan: Power, Authority and the Greek Orthodox Church in the early Ottoman Centuries by Tom Papademetriou, and Jonathan Harris tackles a book with a credible new thesis, but which contains significant methodological flaws (no 1851).

Next up is Democracy’s Muse: How Thomas Jefferson Became an FDR Liberal, a Reagan Republican, and a Tea Party Fanatic, all the while being Dead by Andrew Burstein. David Houpt reviews an interesting and relevant analysis of the politics of historical memory (no. 1850).

Steve Cushion then discusses two very different books on modern Cuba, as he reviews Revolutionary Cuba: A History by Luis Martínez Fernández and Leadership in the Cuban Revolution: The Unseen Story by Antoni Kapcia (no. 1849, with response here).

Finally we have Dressing the Part: Textiles as Propaganda in the Middle Ages, edited by Kate Dimitrova and Margaret Goehring. Janet Snyder believes that despite some structural drawbacks, this collection is an important publication (no. 1848).

New reviews: C19 cities, Austro-Hungary in WW1, civil rights and Carolingian religion


5We start this week with The Demographic Imagination and the Nineteenth Century City. Paris, London, New York by Nicholas Daly. Martin Hewitt and the author discuss a rich and rewarding new book (no. 1847, with response here).

Then we turn to Marvin Benjamin Fried’s Austro-Hungarian War Aims in the Balkans during World War I, and Mesut Uyar reviews a book which will be of value to scholars of Austria-Hungary and generalists alike (no. 1846).

Next up is Power, Politics, and the Decline of the Civil Rights Movement: A Fragile Coalition, 1967-1973 by Christopher P. Lehman. Emma Folwell believes this study provides an engaging and much-needed narrative of the fate of national Civil Rights organisations (no. 1845).

Finally Benjamin Pohl recommends Felice Lifshitz’s Religious Women in Early Carolingian Francia: A Study of Manuscript Transmission and Monastic Culture, a fine and well-argued piece of scholarship (no. 1844).

New reviews: Civil War, Dissenters, Presbyterians and Indian Ocean


abraham-lincoln-civil-war-1We start this week with Don H. Doyle’s Cause of all Nations: An International History of the American Civil War, as Martin Crawford and the author discuss a persuasive account of the American Civil War’s contemporary significance (no. 1843, with response here).

Next up is The Dissenters Volume III: The Crisis and Conscience of Nonconformity by Michael R. Watts. D. Densil Morgan praises a fitting epitaph to a life-long academic venture (no. 1842).

Then we turn to Benjamin Bankhurst’s Ulster Presbyterians and the Scots Irish Diaspora, 1750-1764, with David Dickson reviewing a short but tantalizing monograph which shows the importance of this general field, and presents a fascinating case study within it (no. 1841).

Finally we have Ocean of Trade: South Asian Merchants, Africa and the Indian Ocean, c1750-1850 by Pedro Machado. Gerard McCann believes this book succeeds in its aim to do ‘global history from a regional perspective’ (no. 1840).

New reviews: Unemployment, Christian missions, Latin law and Galileo


homeless_1625213cWe start this week with Unemployment, Welfare, and Masculine Citizenship: ‘So Much Honest Poverty’ in Britain, 1870-1930 by Marjorie Levine-Clark. Nicole Longpré and the author discuss a book which will appeal to those working in fields across the history of modern Britain (no. 1839, with response here).

Next up is Karen Vallgårda’s Imperial Childhoods and Christian Mission: Education and Emotions in South India and Denmark. John Stuart recommends an impressive book, distinguished by wide and close reading and by innovative methodology (no. 1838).

Then we turn to Law and History in the Latin East by Peter Edbury, which Stephen Donnachie extols as an erudite collection, of vast benefit to any who wish to investigate further the law and history of the Latin East (no. 1837).

Finally we have Thomas F. Mayer’s The Roman Inquisition: Trying Galileo. Maurice Finocchiaro cautions against accepting the thesis of a flawed and provocative book (no. 1836).

New reviews: Renaissance, TV multiculturalism, Book of Common Prayer and Cold War diplomacy


ruggiero2We begin this week with The Renaissance in Italy: a Social and Cultural History of the Rinascimento by Guido Ruggiero. Stephen Bowd and the author discuss a new social and cultural history of Italy between 1250 and 1575 (no. 1835, with response here).

Next up is The Vision of a Nation: Making Multiculturalism on British Television by Gavin Schaffer. Stephen Brooke praises a superb book which scholars of race in Britain and culture in Britain will find indispensable (no. 1834).

Then we turn to Richard Baxter’s Reformed Liturgy: A Puritan Alternative to the Book of Common Prayer by Glen J. Segger. Benjamin Guyer believes this book makes an important contribution to both the study of early modern liturgy and the history of English religious controversy (no. 1833)

Finally, we have Martin Folly’s Historical Dictionary of U.S. Diplomacy During the Cold War. Thomas Tunstall Allcock recommends, with caveats, a hugely useful work and a remarkable achievement for a single-authored volume (no. 1832).

New reviews: US political history, Huguenots, money and Istanbul


critchlow2This week  we begin with Donald Critchlow’s American Political History: A Very Short Introduction, as Mark Power Smith and the author debate a concise, readable narrative of American political history (no. 1831, with response here).

Then we turn to Experiencing Exile: Huguenot Refugees in the Dutch Republic, 1680–1700 by David van der Linden. Dave Papendorf praises a valuable contribution to Huguenot history and early modern history in general (no. 1830).

Next up is Christine Desan’s Making Money: Coin, Currency, and the Coming of Capitalism, with Katie Ball and the author discussing an important contribution to monetary history (no. 1829, with response here).

Finally we have Midnight at the Pera Palace: The Birth of Modern Istanbul by Charles King, which Pheroze Unwalla applauds as an enthralling read; a popular history that will be appreciated by scholarly audiences (no. 1828).


New reviews: Legal history, slavery, tabloids and consorts



The rather serious-looking Edward Coke…

We start this week with David Chan Smith’s Sir Edward Coke and the Reformation of the Laws: Religion, Politics and Jurisprudence, 1578–1616, as Daniel Gosling and the author discuss an impressive and readable legal history drawing on a huge range of legal cases and reports (no. 1827, with response here).

Next up is American Slavery: A Very Short Introduction by Heather Andrea Williams. Thomas Strange reviews a book which provides a concise overview, but which has some significant omissions (no. 1826).

Then we turn to Adrian Bingham and Martin Conboy’s Tabloid Century: The Popular Press in Britain, 1896 to the Present. Susanne Stoddart believes this book is vital reading for scholars interested in how the popular press shaped, and was shaped by, the 20th-century (no. 1825).

Finally we have the aforementioned The Man behind the Queen: Male Consorts in History, edited by Miles Taylor and Charles Beem. Estelle Paranque recommends a valuable contribution to the field that should be read by anyone interested in royal studies (no. 1824).


New reviews: African-American history, Civil War Scotland and Ireland, healthcare and medieval databases


mlk1We start this week with Interpreting African American History and Culture at Museum and Historic Sites by Max A. van Balgooy, as Hannah Rose-Murray and the author discuss an engaging account of how African-American history is interpreted today (no. 1823, with response here).

Next up is Barry Robertson’s Royalists at War in Scotland and Ireland, 1638-1650,  as Chris Langley finds this book to be an important milestone in our appreciation of the differences of British and Irish experience (no. 1822).

Then we turn to Healthcare in Ireland and Britain from 1850: Voluntary, Regional and Comparative Perspectives, edited by Donnacha Seán Lucey and Virginia Crossman. Laura Kelly believes this impressive volume will appeal to all those interested in the history of healthcare and welfare (no. 1821).

Finally Justin Colson reviews two websites offering exceptional new insights into the social and economic history of the late medieval period, in Web Databases for Late Medieval Social and Economic History: England’s Immigrants and the Overland Trade Project (no. 1820, with response here).

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