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Reviews in History

New reviews: Unemployment, Christian missions, Latin law and Galileo


homeless_1625213cWe start this week with Unemployment, Welfare, and Masculine Citizenship: ‘So Much Honest Poverty’ in Britain, 1870-1930 by Marjorie Levine-Clark. Nicole Longpré and the author discuss a book which will appeal to those working in fields across the history of modern Britain (no. 1839, with response here).

Next up is Karen Vallgårda’s Imperial Childhoods and Christian Mission: Education and Emotions in South India and Denmark. John Stuart recommends an impressive book, distinguished by wide and close reading and by innovative methodology (no. 1838).

Then we turn to Law and History in the Latin East by Peter Edbury, which Stephen Donnachie extols as an erudite collection, of vast benefit to any who wish to investigate further the law and history of the Latin East (no. 1837).

Finally we have Thomas F. Mayer’s The Roman Inquisition: Trying Galileo. Maurice Finocchiaro cautions against accepting the thesis of a flawed and provocative book (no. 1836).

New reviews: Renaissance, TV multiculturalism, Book of Common Prayer and Cold War diplomacy


ruggiero2We begin this week with The Renaissance in Italy: a Social and Cultural History of the Rinascimento by Guido Ruggiero. Stephen Bowd and the author discuss a new social and cultural history of Italy between 1250 and 1575 (no. 1835, with response here).

Next up is The Vision of a Nation: Making Multiculturalism on British Television by Gavin Schaffer. Stephen Brooke praises a superb book which scholars of race in Britain and culture in Britain will find indispensable (no. 1834).

Then we turn to Richard Baxter’s Reformed Liturgy: A Puritan Alternative to the Book of Common Prayer by Glen J. Segger. Benjamin Guyer believes this book makes an important contribution to both the study of early modern liturgy and the history of English religious controversy (no. 1833)

Finally, we have Martin Folly’s Historical Dictionary of U.S. Diplomacy During the Cold War. Thomas Tunstall Allcock recommends, with caveats, a hugely useful work and a remarkable achievement for a single-authored volume (no. 1832).

New reviews: US political history, Huguenots, money and Istanbul


critchlow2This week  we begin with Donald Critchlow’s American Political History: A Very Short Introduction, as Mark Power Smith and the author debate a concise, readable narrative of American political history (no. 1831, with response here).

Then we turn to Experiencing Exile: Huguenot Refugees in the Dutch Republic, 1680–1700 by David van der Linden. Dave Papendorf praises a valuable contribution to Huguenot history and early modern history in general (no. 1830).

Next up is Christine Desan’s Making Money: Coin, Currency, and the Coming of Capitalism, with Katie Ball and the author discussing an important contribution to monetary history (no. 1829, with response here).

Finally we have Midnight at the Pera Palace: The Birth of Modern Istanbul by Charles King, which Pheroze Unwalla applauds as an enthralling read; a popular history that will be appreciated by scholarly audiences (no. 1828).


New reviews: Legal history, slavery, tabloids and consorts



The rather serious-looking Edward Coke…

We start this week with David Chan Smith’s Sir Edward Coke and the Reformation of the Laws: Religion, Politics and Jurisprudence, 1578–1616, as Daniel Gosling and the author discuss an impressive and readable legal history drawing on a huge range of legal cases and reports (no. 1827, with response here).

Next up is American Slavery: A Very Short Introduction by Heather Andrea Williams. Thomas Strange reviews a book which provides a concise overview, but which has some significant omissions (no. 1826).

Then we turn to Adrian Bingham and Martin Conboy’s Tabloid Century: The Popular Press in Britain, 1896 to the Present. Susanne Stoddart believes this book is vital reading for scholars interested in how the popular press shaped, and was shaped by, the 20th-century (no. 1825).

Finally we have the aforementioned The Man behind the Queen: Male Consorts in History, edited by Miles Taylor and Charles Beem. Estelle Paranque recommends a valuable contribution to the field that should be read by anyone interested in royal studies (no. 1824).


New reviews: African-American history, Civil War Scotland and Ireland, healthcare and medieval databases


mlk1We start this week with Interpreting African American History and Culture at Museum and Historic Sites by Max A. van Balgooy, as Hannah Rose-Murray and the author discuss an engaging account of how African-American history is interpreted today (no. 1823, with response here).

Next up is Barry Robertson’s Royalists at War in Scotland and Ireland, 1638-1650,  as Chris Langley finds this book to be an important milestone in our appreciation of the differences of British and Irish experience (no. 1822).

Then we turn to Healthcare in Ireland and Britain from 1850: Voluntary, Regional and Comparative Perspectives, edited by Donnacha Seán Lucey and Virginia Crossman. Laura Kelly believes this impressive volume will appeal to all those interested in the history of healthcare and welfare (no. 1821).

Finally Justin Colson reviews two websites offering exceptional new insights into the social and economic history of the late medieval period, in Web Databases for Late Medieval Social and Economic History: England’s Immigrants and the Overland Trade Project (no. 1820, with response here).

New reviews: English Americans, Hiroshima, French Freemasons and Stalin’s citizens


gaskill2We start off with Between Two Worlds: How the English Became Americans by Malcolm Gaskill. Joan Redmond and the author discuss a work of impressive scope and great depth (no. 1819, with response here).

Next we turn to Ran Zwigenberg’s Hiroshima: The Origins of Global Memory Culture, and Danae Karydaki believes that the greatest strength of this book is an exceptional combination of meticulous and multi-level archival research with a strong critical voice (no. 1818).

Then we turn to Brotherly Love: Freemasonry and Male Friendship in Enlightenment France by Kenneth Loiselle. Pierre-Yves Beaurepaire finds this book to be elegantly written, and steeped in archival research and interdisciplinary reflection (no. 1817).

Finally we have Serhy Yekelchyk’s  Stalin’s Citizens: Everyday Politics in the Wake of Total War, with Kees Boterbloem enjoying a book which provides a sound argument embedded in a solid investigation of the evidence (no. 1816).

New reviews: Victorian literary cities, US Civil War propaganda in Britain, Christian monitors and WW1 sexuality


gatrell25We begin with By Accident or Design: Writing the Victorian Metropolis by Paul Fyfe. Anna Feintuck and the author discuss a stimulating work of urban and intellectual history, literary criticism, archival theory, and more (no. 1815, with response here).

Then we turn to Tom Sebrell’s Persuading John Bull: Union and Confederate Propaganda in Britain, 1860-1865. Skye Montgomery believes historians of Anglo-American relations will find this book a welcome addition to the burgeoning literature on British public opinion (no. 1814).

Next up is The Christian Monitors: The Church of England and the Age of Benevolence, 1680-1730 by  Brent Sirota, which David Manning finds stimulating and readable, but not necessarily deserving of the initial hype (no. 1813).

Finally, there is An Intimate History of the Front – Masculinity, Sexuality and German Soldiers in the First World War by Jason Crouthamel. Helen Roche hopes this work will open up further studies of this fascinating and under-researched body of evidence (no. 1812).

New reviews: notebooks, Franco, Armenians and medieval geographies


yeo2We start this week with Notebooks, English Virtuosi, and Early Modern Science by Richard Yeo, as Philippa Hellawell and the author discuss an intelligent, well-researched, and informative account of the practice of note-taking in early modern science (no. 1811, with response here).

Next up is Stanley G. Payne and Jesús Palacios Tapias’s controversial Franco: A Personal and Political Biography. Antonio Cazorla-Sanchez reviews a book which presents the dictator in a better light than his critics have typically done (no. 1810).

Then we turn to Denial of Violence: Ottoman Past, Turkish Present and Collective Violence against the Armenians, 1789-2009 by Fatma Müge Göçek, which Jo Laycock welcomes as a highly detailed account of the history and the aftermaths of the Armenian genocide (no. 1809).

Finally we have Keith Lilley’s Mapping Medieval Geographies: Geographical Encounters in the Latin West and Beyond, 300–1600. Justin Colson praises a valuable collection of cutting edge interpretations of geographies in the Middle Ages (no. 1808).

New reviews: Chinese aristocracy, royal marriages, US and WW1 and Irish Times


Departure_Herald-Ming_DynastyWe start this week with The Destruction of the Medieval Chinese Aristocracy by Nicolas Tackett, as Michael Hoeckelmann and the author discuss a work that will revolutionise our understanding of medieval China (no. 1807, with response here).

Next up is David D’Avray’s Dissolving Royal Marriages: A Documentary History, 860-1600. Danna Messer recommends an invaluable and truly impressive collection of documentary source material (no. 1806).

Then we turn to The Deluge: The Great War, America, and the Remaking of the Global Order, 1916-1931 by Adam Tooze. Kevin Matthews finds this a compelling story, but one shot through with misstatements, contradictions, inconsistencies and other errors (no. 1805).

Finally we have Terence Brown’s The Irish Times: 150 Years of Influence, and Carole O’Reilly believes this book represents a valuable contribution to our understanding of the role of a newspaper in national public life (no. 1804).

Reviews in History fashion special IV


fashion2We end our monthly fashion special with Bethan Bide’s assessment of the Fashion on the Ration exhibition at the Imperial War Museum, and she reports on a thoughtful exhibition which could be bolder in using material culture evidence to signpost the counter narratives contained within the objects on display (no. 1803).

Next up is Textiles, Fashion and Design Reform in Austria-Hungary Before the First World War by Rebecca Houze. Shona Kallestrup believes this book provokes a welcome reconsideration of how we understand the complex cultural tapestry of Vienna (no. 1802).

Finally for fashion, we  turn to Fashionable Queens: Body – Power – Gender, edited by Eva Flicker and Monika Seidl, with Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell warning against a muddled mixed bag of an essay collection (no. 1801).

We also have a great review of the newly enhanced Welsh Newspapers Online website, as Paul O’Leary reviews a formidable resource with enormous potential for the study of the 19th and early 20th centuries (no. 1800).

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