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New reviews: Magna Carta, Lady Antonia, memory and French Army

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The slippers of Archbishop Walter on loan from Canterbury Cathedral on display in Magna Carta Law Liberty Legacy, British LibraryWe’re delighted to be able to present to you a review of the new BL exhibition on Magna Carta: Law, Liberty, Legacy. John Sabapathy reviews a wonderful exhibition which is as much about Magna Carta’s 800 year reception as its immediate 13th-century matrix (no. 1749).

A further treat is a new Daniel Snowman interview, in which he talks to Lady Antonia Fraser about her work as a historian and biographer (no. 1748).

Next we turn to The Memory of the People: Custom and Popular Senses of the Past in Early Modern England by Andy Wood. Brodie Waddell believes that the author has produced a study that proves the centrality of custom and popular memory across more than three centuries (no. 1747).

Finally, Mario Draper recommends The French Army and the First World War by Elizabeth Greenhalgh, on the grounds of the quality of the extensive research, the clarity with which it is delivered and the insightfulness on offer (no. 1746).

New reviews: Roy Foster interview, early modern pamphlets, C19 women professionals and Nat Turner

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foster2We start off this week with another in our occasional interview series, with Daniel Snowman talking to Professor Roy Foster about his recent work on the human dimension behind the Easter Rising, Vivid Faces (no. 1745).

Next we have Thomas Dekker and the Culture of Pamphleteering in Early Modern London by Anna Bayman. Kirsty Rolfe and the author discuss a highly readable study, with important implications for critical understanding of ‘popular print’ and the cultures with which it interacted (no. 1744, with response here).

Then we turn to Crafting the Woman Professional in the Long Nineteenth Century, edited by Kryriaki Hadjiafxendi and Patricia Zakreski, which Zoe Thomas believes will positively contribute to a number of academic fields (no. 1743).

Finally there is David F. Allmendinger Jr.’s Nat Turner and the Rising in Southampton County, as Vanessa Holden reviews an account of the most famous slave rebellion in American history (no. 1742).

 

New reviews: Roy Jenkins and his biographer, Abraham Lincoln and early modern alehouses

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jenkins2More fruits of that pressure now, anyway, as we have a special feature on biographer John Campbell. Adam Timmins looks back over his previous work (no. 1740) as a prelude to Robert Saunder’s examination of his latest effort, Roy Jenkins: A Well-Rounded Life (no. 1741).

Then we cross the Atlantic, turning to Founders’ Son: A Life of Abraham Lincoln by Richard Brookhiser. Sean Ledwith and the author discuss an innovative biography of the 16th President (no. 1739, with response here).

Finally we have Mark Hailwood’s Alehouses and Good Fellowship in Early Modern England. Jennifer Bishop believes that this book makes a very strong case for the alehouse as one of the key institutions in early modern society (no. 1738).

 

New reviews: Early modern women x 2, French Revolution, colonial Seoul

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ferron

Mary Sidney Herbert (1561-1621), one of the stars of Mediatrix

We start with Mediatrix: Women, Politics and Literary Production in Early Modern England by Julie Crawford. Alice Ferron and the author discuss a book which provides innovative close readings of the lives and writings of some of early modern England’s most famous and controversial aristocratic women (no. 1737, with response here).

Then we have Female Alliances: Gender, Identity and Friendship in Early Modern Britain by Amanda Herbert. Leonie Hannan praises a beautifully written and insightfully argued work, based on meticulous primary research (no. 1735).

Next up is Eric Hazan’s A People’s History of the French Revolution, and Michiel Rys believes this book succeeds in delivering a vivid, lucid, informative, detailed account of the French Revolution (no. 1736).

Finally we turn to Todd Henry’s Assimilating Seoul: Japanese Rule and the Politics of Public Space in Colonial Korea, 1910–1945. Mark Caprio finds this book brings an impressive depth to our understanding of the Japanese articulation of their colonial goals (no. 1734).

New reviews: Inter-war health, global history, Parisian smiles and US anti-communism

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kchFirst up is The Politics of Hospital Provision in Early Twentieth-Century Britain by Barry Doyle], as Martin Gorsky and the author discuss a new study of Britain’s inter-war health services (no. 1733, with response here).

Then we turn to Lynn Hunt’s Writing History in the Global Era. Julia McClure believes this book’s identification of globalization as a paradigm establishes the foundations for analysing the meanings and implications of globalization narratives (no. 1732).

Next up is The Smile Revolution In Eighteenth Century Paris by Colin Jones, and Jennifer Wallis finds this book beautifully complicates the notion that the smile is a static and timeless form of emotional expression (no. 1731).

Finally we have Little “Red Scares”: Anti-Communism and Political Repression in the United States, 1921-1946, edited by Robert Justin Goldstein. Jennifer Luff welcomes a new edited collection on inter-war anti-communism (no. 1730).

 

New reviews: Trust, Italian Army, British India and Colonial Boston

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hoskingWe kick off this week with Geoffrey Hosking’s Trust: A History, with Eric M. Uslaner and the author disagreeing over this key issue (no. 1729, with response here).

Next up is The Italian Army and the First World War by John Gooch. Mario Draper reviews a book which will almost certainly remain a seminal text for scholars of the period and anyone else interested in European military history (no. 1728).

Then we turn to G. J. Bryant’s The Emergence of British Power in India, 1600-1784: A Grand Strategic Interpretation, and James Lees finds this book to be a refreshing addition to the historiography (no. 1727).

Finally we have Robert Love’s Warnings: Searching for Strangers in Colonial Boston by Cornelia Hughes Dayton and Sharon Salinger. Kristin O’Brassill-Kulfan believes this research fills an important gap in the on-the-ground history of pre-industrial poverty in the United States (no. 1726).

New reviews: John Wyclif, Medieval space, Cypriot communists and labour and liberalism

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1280px-Wycliffecollege_toronto_chapel1We start this week with John Wyclif on War and Peace by Rory Cox. Christopher Allmand and the reviewer discuss a work which places Wyclif in a long historical context (no. 1725, with response here).

Then we turn to Space in the Medieval West: Places, Territories, and Imagined Geographies, edited by Meredith Cohen and Fanny Madeline. Sarah Ann Milne recommends a book which serves to substantiate and complement existing studies whilst offering a number of fascinating new explorations (no. 1724).

Next up is Yiannakis Kolokasidis’s History of the Communist Party in Cyprus: Colonialism, Class and the Cypriot Left, which Alexios Alecou finds to be an original contribution, rich with theoretical insights and practical implications (no. 1723).

Finally we turn to Labour and the Caucus: Working-Class Radicalism and Organised Liberalism in England, 1868-1888 by James Owen. Jules Gehrke believes this book is sure to become a valued part of the scholarly conversation (no. 1722).

New reviews: Eurasian Borderlands, peace, early American wars, Reformation

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eurasia-map-oldWe start with The Struggle for the Eurasian Borderlands: From the Rise of Early Modern Empires to the End of the First World War by Alfred Rieber. Simone Pelizza and the author discuss a book which is destined to be an indispensable reference work for both students and researchers for many years to come (no. 1721, with response here).

Next up is William Mulligan’s The Great War for Peace. Cyril Pearce reviews a significant, if flawed, contribution to the debate about the impact of the First World War (no. 1720).

Then we have the Encyclopedia of the Wars of the Early American Republic, 1783-1812: A Political, Social, and Military History, edited by Spencer C. Tucker, which Jonathan Chandler believes this encyclopedia will be a welcome addition to the shelves of any library (no. 1719).

Finally we turn to Reformation Unbound: Protestant Visions of Reform in England, 1525–1590 by Karl Gunther. Donald McKim finds this to be a splendid study which clearly delineates the various Protestant visions of reform in England (no. 1718).

New reviews: Lincoln and Latin America, English clergy, Louis XIV and the Indian Army

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lincolndouglasWe start this week with Slavery, Race and Conquest in the Tropics : Lincoln, Douglas, and the Future of Latin America by Robert E. May. Phillip Magness and the author debate a book which gives us a Civil War that was both the product of international affairs, and a shaping force on their subsequent course (no. 1717, with response here).

Then we turn to Hugh M. Thomas’s The Secular Clergy in England, 1066-1216, and Katherine Harvey and the author discuss a book which is surely destined to become one of the definitive works in the field for many years to come (no. 1716, with response here).

Next up is Status Interaction During the Reign of Louis XIV by Giora Sternberg. Linda Kiernan believes this book presents historians of the court with a vigorous model to test (no. 1715).

Finally we have George Morton-Jack’s The Indian Army on the Western Front: India’s Expeditionary Force to France and Belgium in the First World War. Adam Prime finds this to be an extremely stimulating book, which should appeal to academics and enthusiasts alike (no. 1714).

New reviews: London women, Tokyo Zoo, Callaghan Government, Mystic Ark

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williamsFirst up is Women, Work and Sociability in Early Modern London by Tim Reinke-Williams. Hannah Hogan and the author discuss an inspiring starting-point for further, in-depth histories of women, work and sociability in early modern England (no. 1713, with response here).

Then we turn to Ian Jared Miller’s The Nature of the Beasts: Empire and Exhibition at the Tokyo Imperial Zoo, which Jonathan Saha recommends as being important beyond its obvious and substantial contribution to both Japanese history and zoo history (no. 1712).

Next up is Crisis? What Crisis? The Callaghan Government and the British ‘Winter of Discontent’ by John Shepherd. Ian Cawood reviews a concisely written, forensic political analysis of the defining historical myth by which all British political parties still live (no. 1711).

Finally we have The Mystic Ark: Hugh of Saint Victor, Art, and Thought in the Twelfth Century by Conrad Rudolph, which Karl Kinsella believes to be a thoroughly worked out and thoughtful piece of scholarship (no. 1710).

 

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