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History DMT


Historians and their Data: Forthcoming Workshop exploring Research Data Management in History

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HRI1A critical skill for anyone conducting research in History is their ability to properly manage their digital data. A research project is only as good as the evidence that underlies it and that evidence needs to be clear, sharable, and reusable.

Join us on Monday 14 April 2014 at the Humanities Research Institute, University of Sheffield for a workshop that aims to help postgraduate students and early career researchers to make better use of their data by providing skills training in data management tailored directly toward the Historian.

This is the third and final workshop of the AHRC-funded History DMT (Data Management Training and Guidance) project, which seeks to integrate best practice, good principles, and skills of research data management within the postgraduate curriculum and among early career historians. The workshop will showcase the chief deliverable of the project: a free online training course dedicated to the research data types that historians are most likely to come across in their research.

Further, the workshop will build upon the specialist training workshops which were held at the University of Hull and the Institute of Historical Research (University of London) by exploring the role of data management and training in research.

The workshop is FREE to attend. Academic staff, early career researchers and postgraduate students are welcome.

Please register your interest by contacting Clare Mills c.e.mills@sheffield.ac.uk. Please include in your email any dietary or access requirements and if you would like a travel bursary (a limited number of travel bursaries are available for students. If you believe that your costs will be significantly high or have any questions about the bursary please contact matt.phillpott@sas.ac.uk).

 

Morning

10.30                     Coffee & registration

11.00                     Introduction

11.15                     Introducing the History Data Management Online Training Course

11.45                     Student Presentation #1

12.15                     Student Presentation #2

12.45                     Lunch

Afternoon

13.30                     Student Presentation #3

14.00                     Managing Data: Understanding Its Role and Impact in a History Research Project

14.30                     Group activity: using the course materials, evaluation

15.15                     Coffee Break

15.30                     Group feedback on the course materials

16.00                     Embedding Data Management Training

16.30                     Workshop ends

Location: Humanities Research Institute, University of Sheffield (34 Gell Street, Sheffield S3 7QY)

Event: History DMT workshop

Date: Monday 14th April 2014

Time: 10.30am-4.30pm

 

For further information about this workshop (including speaker details) check out our workshop home page.

 

Managing your research: from creating to sharing

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shutterstock_120033487To be effective researchers historians must learn skills to enable them to manage their research processes so that everything they do is recoverable, usable, and useful. This workshop is intended to help postgraduate students and early career researchers to think more about what it is they do, to learn about digital tools that can help them become better and more efficient historians, and to recognise the importance of being able to share that research in terms of both the data/research gathered and in terms of publishing.

This workshop looks at various aspects of the research process, providing guidance, ideas, and training in how to be more efficient and better at the research that you do. It is part of the History DMT (data management training) project between the Institute of Historical Research (London); the Department of History (Hull); and the Humanities Research Institute (Sheffield). The workshop is FREE and refreshments, including lunch are available.

To register for the workshop please fill in a booking form on the Institute of Historical Research website.

 A number of bursaries are available to help with travel costs so please indicate if you are interested in one of these in your application. 

Morning

10.30                     Coffee & registration

11.00                     Introduction (Matt Phillpott)

11.15                     Researchers projects – managing their data

11.45                     Bibliographical Tools

12.15                     Practical activity

13.00                     Lunch

Afternoon

14.00                     Sharing Data

14.30                     Open Access

15.00                     Break

15.15                     Practical Activity

16.00                     Conclusion

16.30                     Workshop ends

This is the second of three workshops for the History DMT project. The previous workshop was held in Hull in December (see this previous blog post for full details). The third will be held in Sheffield in April. Each session is intended as a standalone; however, if you attend more than one session we believe that this would be highly beneficial.

Location: Senate House (University of London)

Date: 27 February 2014

Time: 10.30am-4.30pm

Places are limited. To reserve a place please fill in the booking form here. If you would like to learn more about the workshop then please contact Matt Phillpott at matt.phillpott@sas.ac.uk who is happy to help.

Managing your Data for Historians – new AHRC-funded project History DMT

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(Shutterstock)

(Shutterstock)

Historians don’t often like to think about data management.  Indeed, it is almost considered an ugly word or a taboo.  Data Management gets in the way of the interesting stuff – the research, the learning.  Nevertheless, it is vital to the work that we do.  History is data.  It is the essential essence of the subject.  Yet, it is so easy to leave your folder system in a complete mess or not to consider issues of preservation or back-up until necessary (or until your hard drive dies on you!).  Stuff that you produce now, for current use is understandable, but 6 months down the line, a year?  Perhaps not so much.

It is for this reason that the Institute of Historical Research in partnership with the Department of History at the University of Hull and Sheffield, as well as the Humanities Research Institute (Sheffield), applied to the AHRC Collaborative Skills Development strand late last year, to undertake a project called History DMT.  The bid was successful and work began in February.

History DMT stands for Data Management Training and Guidance.  We seek to integrate best practice, good principles, and skills of research data management within the postgraduate curriculum and among early career historians through a series of specialist workshops at London, Hull, and Sheffield and through the development of a free online training course dedicated to the research data types that historians are most likely to come across in their research.

Various pathways will enable a hands-on approach to research data management that covers the many types of data which historians generate, as well as the means with which to share that data. These will cover:

  • Textual materials
  • Visual sources
  • Oral History
  • Statistical data

Over the coming months the History SPOT blog will contain various posts about this project as it progresses, so please keep an eye out.

Further Information

This is an AHRC-funded project, as part of the Collaborative Skills Development strand. History DMT is led by the Institute of Historical Research in collaboration with the Department of History, University of Hull and the Humanities Research Institute, University of Sheffield. The principal grant holder is Professor Matthew Davies (IHR), with Dr Matt Phillpott (IHR) acting as project manager. Chris Awre (Head of Information Management within Library and Learning Innovation, University of Hull) and John Nicholls (Hull) will lead at the University of Hull, and Michael Pidd (HRI Manager, University of Sheffield) and Sharon Howard (HRI, University of Sheffield), from the University of Sheffield.