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Historical Research


The Annual Pollard Prize 2014 – closing date Friday 30 May

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Pollard_w5cmEntries are invited for this year’s Annual Pollard Prize (sponsored by Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.) awarded for the best paper presented at an IHR seminar by a postgraduate student or by a researcher within one year of completing the PhD.

First prize

Fast track publication in the prestigious IHR journal, Historical Research, and £200 of Blackwell books.

Runner up prizes

Publication in Historical Research, and a selection of Blackwell books.

Application

Applicants are required to have delivered a paper during the academic year in which the award is made. Submissions should be supported by a reference from a convenor of the appropriate seminar. Papers should be fully footnoted, although it is not necessary at this stage to follow Historical Research house style. All papers submitted must be eligible for publication.

The closing date for submissions is Friday 30 May 2014

Enquiries and submissions should be directed to the Executive Editor, Historical Research (Jane.Winters@sas.ac.uk). If you are unable to submit by email, please include a PC disk or CD-Rom with any postal submission to:

The Editor
Historical Research (Pollard Prize)
Institute of Historical Research
University of London
Senate House
London WC1E 7HU

New issue of Historical Research

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Historical Research – November 2014 (vol. 87, no. 238)

HR

Contents:

Articles

Toward a historical dialectic of culinary styles (pages 581–590)

Ken Albala

Episcopal emotions: tears in the life of the medieval bishop (pages 591–610)

Katherine Harvey

Licit medicine or ‘Pythagorean necromancy’? The ‘Sphere of Life and Death’ in late medieval England (pages 611–632)

Joanne Edge

The Elizabethan succession question in Roger Edwardes’s ‘Castra Regia’ (1569) and ‘Cista Pacis Anglie’ (1576) (pages 633–654)

Victoria Smith

The harassment of Isaac Allen: puritanism, parochial politics and Prestwich’s troubles during the first English civil war (pages 655–678)

James Mawdesley

‘Britons, strike home’: politics, patriotism and popular song in British culture, c.1695–1900 (pages 679–702)

Martha Vandrei

‘The other boys of Kilmichael’: No. 2 Section, ‘C’ Company, Auxiliary Division Royal Irish Constabulary, 28 November 1920 (pages 703–722)

Andrew Nelson

‘For the freedom of captive European nations’: east European exiles in the Cold War (pages 723–741)

Martin Nekola

Notes and Documents

John of Oxnead, chronicler of St. Benet’s Holm (pages 742–743)

Julian Luxford

Robert Bale’s chronicle and the second battle of St. Albans (pages 744–750)

Hannes Kleineke

The Essex inquisitions of 1556: the Colchester certificate (pages 751–763)

P. R. Cavill

 

New Historical Research articles

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Execution-of-Thomas-of-Lancaster

False traitors or worthy knights? Treason and rebellion against Edward II in the Scalacronica and the Anglo-Norman prose Brut chronicles by Andy King

This article examines three vernacular chronicles written from contrasting view-points: the Scalacronica of Sir Thomas Gray, whose father was linked with Edward II’s court, and the ‘Long’ and ‘Short’ continuations of the prose Brut, both markedly sympathetic towards Thomas of Lancaster, leader of the opposition to the king. This is a period which saw a sea change in the crown’s attitude towards rebellion, but the accounts of these chronicles suggest that a significant part of the political community did not accept the crown’s new definition of treason.

 

Radical Geneva? The publication of Knox’s First Blast of the Trumpet and Goodman’s How Superior Powers Oght to be Obeyd in context by Charlotte Panofre

John Knox’s First Blast and Christopher Goodman’s Superior Powers arguably represent two of the most radical pamphlets produced during the reign of Mary Tudor. Both texts were published in Geneva in early 1558 and attracted the displeasure not only of their authors’ fellow exiles, but also of Queen Elizabeth herself when she heard of their publication. Ever since, these pamphlets have been closely associated with the climate of radicalism which supposedly prevailed in Geneva under the aegis of Calvin. Yet, it is also clear from his writings that Calvin never went so far as to endorse any of the Marian exiles’ most controversial ideas. Rather, archival and bibliographical evidence suggests that it was the lively and highly competitive Genevan book trade, combined with inconsistent mechanisms of censorship and a system of monopolies favouring the wealthiest printing firms, which provided ideal conditions for the publication of these pamphlets.

New Historical Research article

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Flag_of_Comecon_svgThe creation of the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance as seen from the Romanian archives by Elena Dragomir

This article presents documents from the archive of the central committee of the Romanian Communist party, recording the January 1949 Moscow conference that established the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance (C.M.E.A.). It argues that the creation of the C.M.E.A. began as a Romanian initiative and presents the process by which the document constituting the C.M.E.A. was elaborated in early 1949. There is generally very little information on the creation of the C.M.E.A., so while it was not possible to use evidence from the Moscow archives, these findings, corroborated by studies involving sources from other communist archives, will help to create a better understanding of this event.

New Historical Research articles

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Anthropometry_exhibit

Sterilization and the British Conservative party: rethinking the failure of the Eugenics Society’s political strategy in the nineteen-thirties. Bradley W. Hart and Richard Carr

This article argues for a revised view of the British eugenic sterilization campaign, proposing that a failure to maximize the contemporary political terrain significantly contributed to its lack of legislative success. The Eugenics Society’s unwillingness to alienate Labour or overtly to link sterilization to concerns articulated by Conservative M.P.s rendered it somewhat rudderless when, actually, it could have been attached to broader concerns (including the economic depression). While there were key elements arguing for a more aggressively pro-Tory stance, the fact that the strongest advocate of this course, George Pitt-Rivers, was so sympathetic to Nazi Germany undermined this strategy’s chances.

Representing commodified space: maps, leases, auctions and ‘narrations’ of property in Delhi, c.1900−47. Anish Vanaik

This article examines three ways of representing space as a commodity that played key roles in colonial Delhi: maps, lease deeds and auctions. These representations were related to the buying and selling of real estate in distinct ways. At the same time, they also referred to and relied on each other to give effect to their pronouncements. Two elements can be traced running through these disparate representations: connections between space and time, and the imbrication of state and property market. This article argues that the ability to utilize these elements in order to develop narratives about urban space was a critical constituent of state power

New Historical Research articles

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Scouting-Book

 

Courting public favour: the Boy Scout movement and the accident of internationalism, 1907−29 by Scott Johnston

This article explores how the Boy Scout movement moved from an inward looking and decidedly militaristic programme to one which embraced liberal internationalism following the First World War. It argues that the Boy Scouts’ wholehearted embrace of internationalism was not inevitable; in fact it was a complex and inconsistent transition, and the result of unintentional circumstances. Furthermore, internationalism did not replace but merely supplemented the movement’s older aims of organizational autonomy and the promotion of empire. During the inter-war period, these competing motives informed and strained the Boy Scouts’ interactions with the public and with other internationalist organizations such as the League of Nations and the League of Nations Union

Famine is not the problem: a historical perspective by Cormac Ó Gráda

Thanks to the globalization of relief and increasing global food output, the famines of the twenty-first century (so far), Somalia (civil war) and North Korea (autarky) apart, have been small. Today malnutrition is a much more intractable and pressing problem than famine, even though the proportion of the world’s poor that is malnourished has been declining. Moreover, although the prospects for avoiding famines in peacetime in the short run are good, global warming looms in the medium term. These contrasting signals are not lost on international non-governmental organizations.

New Historical Research article online

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220px-A_Chronicle_of_England_-_Page_251_-_Death_of_de_MontfortTwo oaths of the community in 1258 by Joshua Hey

This article looks at two ‘oaths of the community’ of 1258. First, it shows that the oath of the community at Oxford has been widely misinterpreted by historians: it was an oath of mutual aid, not an oath binding the community to reform. Second, it looks at the order for all in the realm to take an oath in October 1258, which has never been fully examined before. This order aimed to bind the entire realm to the reform movement – it was proclaimed in Latin, French and English – yet no chroniclers mentioned it and no mechanism was provided for its enactment.

New Historical Research article:

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Bishop_Robert_Grosseteste,_1896_(crop)

Episcopal emotions: tears in the life of the medieval bishop by Katherine Harvey

This article explores the significance of weeping in the lives of late medieval English bishops (c.1100−c.1400). It considers the lachrymose devotions of saintly bishops alongside tears of grief, friendship and self-pity, and asks how such displays of emotion were understood by contemporary onlookers. It is argued that a bishop’s tears were key to perceptions of his masculinity, sexuality and physical body, which in turn had significant implications for his reputation both as a prelate and as a potential saint.

New Historical Research articles

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Herbert_Read

Herbert Read and the fluid memory of the First World War: poetry, prose and polemic by Matthew S. Adams

Utilizing archival material and analysing Read’s poetry, prose and polemical writing, this article argues that Read’s perception of the war was deeply ambiguous, and shifted in response to the changing view of the conflict in British cultural history. He saw the war as at once disabling and liberating, and his continual return to the conflict as a subject in his writing was a process of attempting to fix its ultimate meaning to his life.

Black people and the criminal justice system: prejudice and practice in later 18th- and  early 19th-century London by Peter King and John Carter Wood

This article explores how attitudes to black people were translated into practice by examining how the latter fared as victims, witnesses and especially as the accused when they came to the Old Bailey in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

Historical Research: new early view articles

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Royal 10 E.IV, f.18vIntelligence and intrigue in the March of Wales: noblewomen and the fall of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, 1274–82 by Emma Cavell

This article examines the part played by key baronial wives of the Welsh Marches in the defeat of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd in 1282. It explores the hidden involvement of women in the conquest of Wales and considers the opportunities available to noblewomen, particularly non-widows, in the Welsh Marches and beyond.

Licit medicine or ‘Pythagorean necromancy’? The ‘Sphere of Life and Death’ in late medieval England by Joanne Edge

 The Elizabethan succession question in Roger Edwardes’s ‘Castra Regia’ (1569) and ‘Cista Pacis Anglie’ (1576) by Victoria Smith

 ‘A considerable portion of the defence of the Empire’: Lisbon and victualling the royal navy during the French Revolutionary War, 1793–1802 by Martin Robson

 Provincial news networks in late Elizabethan Devon by Ian Cooper

Historical Research – new virtual issue

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220px-Elizabeth_Fry_by_Charles_Robert_LeslieThe new virtual issue of Historical Research (Spring 2014)  draws together past and present articles and podcasts on the theme of Charity and Philanthropy.

Articles:

The Medieval Leper-house at ‘Lamford’, Cornwall. Nicholas Orme and Oliver Padel

‘Inky Blots and Rotten Parchment Bonds’: London, Charity briefs and the Guildhall Library. Mark Harris

Fire Disasters and Fire Relief in Sixteenth-century England: the Nantwich Fire of 1583. C. J. Kitghing

Faith, hope and money: the Jesuits and the genesis of fundraising for education, 1550–1650. Dame Olwen Hufton

‘In a few years we shall none of us that now take care of them be here’: Philanthropy and the State in the Thinking of Elizabeth Fry. Anne Summers

Female Philanthropy and Domestic Service in Victorian England. F. K. Prochaska

Working hard at giving it away: Lord Duveen, the British Museum and the Elgin marbles. Elisabeth Kehoe

Eggs, rags and whist drives: popular munificence and the development of provincial medical voluntarism between the wars. Nick Hayes and Barry M. Doyle

‘Every Citizen of Empire Implored to Save the Children!’ Empire, internationalism and the Save the Children Fund in inter-war Britain. Emily Baughan

Before the Cultural Cold Wars: American philanthropy and cultural diplomacy in the inter-war years. Katharina Rietzler

Working for the Germans: British voluntary societies and the German refugee crisis, 1945–50. Matthew Frank

 Podcasts:

Cultures of giving and charity: the Clothworkers Company in early modern London. Annaleigh Margey

Voluntarism and democracy in Britain since the 1790s. Brian Harrison

CIMG3713 ‘Improved dwellings for the industrious classes’: H.A. Darbishire’s Peabody model and its relevance for contemporary housing. Irina Davidovici

Fashioning Mothers of the Next Generation: Philanthropy in Birmingham and Sydney, 1860-1914. Elizabeth Harvey

Two Tier Philanthropy: the Philanthropists who funded the Bishop of London’s Fund and the work that the Fund financed, 1863 to 1914. Sarah Flew

Saving Aboriginal Children: Save the Children Aboriginal Preschools, white volunteers and the rural colour bar. Jennifer Jones

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