The IHR Blog |

Historical Research


The Annual Pollard Prize 2014 – closing date Friday 30 May

by

Pollard_w5cmEntries are invited for this year’s Annual Pollard Prize (sponsored by Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.) awarded for the best paper presented at an IHR seminar by a postgraduate student or by a researcher within one year of completing the PhD.

First prize

Fast track publication in the prestigious IHR journal, Historical Research, and £200 of Blackwell books.

Runner up prizes

Publication in Historical Research, and a selection of Blackwell books.

Application

Applicants are required to have delivered a paper during the academic year in which the award is made. Submissions should be supported by a reference from a convenor of the appropriate seminar. Papers should be fully footnoted, although it is not necessary at this stage to follow Historical Research house style. All papers submitted must be eligible for publication.

The closing date for submissions is Friday 30 May 2014

Enquiries and submissions should be directed to the Executive Editor, Historical Research (Jane.Winters@sas.ac.uk). If you are unable to submit by email, please include a PC disk or CD-Rom with any postal submission to:

The Editor
Historical Research (Pollard Prize)
Institute of Historical Research
University of London
Senate House
London WC1E 7HU

Please follow and like us:

November issue of Historical Research

by

Historical Research, vol. lxxxix, no 246220px-William_and_Mary

Contents:

‘A mission he bore – to Duke William he came’: Harold Godwineson’s Commentumand his covert ambitions. Ad F. J. van Kempen

The chronology of the de Mortemer family of Wigmore, c.1075–1185, and the consolidation of a Marcher lordship. Ian Mortimer

Magna Carta, canon law and pastoral care: excommunication and the church’s publication of the charter. Felicity G. Hill

The English parishes and knights’ fees tax of 1428: a study in fiscal politics and administration. Alex Brayson

‘Per peli e per segni’. Muster rolls, lists and notes: practical military records relating to the last Florentine ordinanze and militia, from Machiavelli to the fall of the Republic (1506–30). Andrea Guidi

Penitence, preachers and politics 1533–47: Thomas Cranmer’s influence on church teaching on penance during the Henrician Reformation. Eric Bramhall

Memories of violence and New English identities in early modern Ireland. Joan Redmond [OPEN ACCESS]

An inflammatory match? Public anxiety and political assurance at the wedding of William III and Mary II. Catriona Murray

Lord Kames’s analysis of the natural origins of religion: the Essays on the Principles of Morality and Natural Religion (1751). R. J. W. Mills

‘We have to compliment the Aristocracy on the exhibition of their morals’: the Ellenborough divorce case (1830) and the politics of scandal in pre-reform London and Vormärz Vienna. Greet De Bock

War, religion and anti-slavery ideology: Isaac Nelson’s radical abolitionist examination of the American civil war. Daniel Ritchie

British humanitarianism and the Russian famine, 1891–2. Luke Kelly

A man called Mahaffy: an Irish cosmopolitan confronts crisis, 1899–1919. Tomás Irish

Combined operations and British strategy, 1900–9. Shawn Grimes

Please follow and like us:

Historical Research – new articles online

by

exclusionThat racial chasm that yawns eternally in our midst’: the British empire and the politics of Asian migration, 1900–14 by Cornelis Heere

In recent years, the study of the networks, ideas and identities that bound the ‘British world’ together has proved a rich field of enquiry in imperial history. This article seeks to apply those insights to an issue that dominated much of Britain’s relations with its settler colonies before the First World War: the controversies surrounding the exclusion of Asian migrants. Racial exclusion has garnered a great deal of scholarly attention in recent years. This article builds on that historiography, but also questions its inattention to the British connection, and hence to considerations of imperial power. It analyses how the debate on immigration served as a canvas on which advocates and detractors of exclusion could paint competing concepts of empire, and seeks to understand how policymakers attempted to manage the migration question through a range of spatial and diplomatic solutions. It will attempt, in sum, to show how a global empire dealt with the problems of a world that seemed increasingly divided along racial lines.

A man called Mahaffy: an Irish cosmopolitan confronts crisis, 1899–1919 by Tomás Irish

This article examines the last twenty years of the life of one of Ireland’s most controversial scholars, the polymath John Pentland Mahaffy. Mahaffy’s name still has wide resonance in Irish historiography owing to his interventions in Irish cultural politics in the decades before 1919. He is frequently seen as an ‘anti-Irish’ figure. This article places Mahaffy in the wider context of international scholarship of the late Victorian era, arguing that he was a cosmopolitan whose overriding concern was not Ireland, or even Britain, but the fracturing of the republic of letters.

‘Per peli e per segni’. Muster rolls, lists and notes: practical military records relating to the last Florentine ordinanze and militia, from Machiavelli to the fall of the Republic (1506–30) by Andrea Guidi

In Renaissance Florence, the militia force created by Machiavelli in 1506, then re-established in 1527–30, involved the production of two types of records: the low-level ‘practical’ records which documented the daily running of an army in the field, such as muster rolls, notes and lists; and the upper-level administrative records, such as the correspondence between governing bodies and military officers. An analysis of published and unpublished sources provides evidence of the importance of such documentary practices, and highlights the problems connected to the loss and preservation of low-level military records relating to Renaissance ordinanze and militia.

The chronology of the de Mortemer family of Wigmore, c.1075–1185, and the consolidation of a Marcher lordship by Ian Mortimer

The twelfth-century chronology of the de Mortemer (later Mortimer) family of Wigmore has proved a difficult and confusing subject. In particular, most scholars have accepted the Complete Peerage genealogy, which incorrectly posits the existence of two distinct lords called Hugh between 1104 and 1181. Here, the English sources are reconsidered alongside independent Norman evidence, resulting in a more robust genealogy and a better context for understanding how the de Mortemers shifted their position from being primarily a Norman family with English and Welsh interests (which they neglected) to being primarily an English one with Norman and Welsh responsibilities (which they did not).

Please follow and like us:

New Historical Research Early View articles

by

William_and_MaryAn inflammatory match? Public anxiety and political assurance at the wedding of William III and Mary II. Catriona Murray

There were undercurrents of discontent amidst the public rejoicing which met the marriage of the future William III and Mary II in November 1677. This article examines the nature of those public misgivings and assesses how Stuart and Orange propaganda responded to the ensuing doubts and anxieties. Through detailed analysis of public festivities, medals and prints, it explores the development of complex images which endorsed the policies and personalities of husband and wife. Ultimately, these hitherto neglected representations of William and Mary were both persuasive and influential, providing the foundations for their regal portrayal, following the 1688 revolution.

Penitence, preachers and politics 1533–47: Thomas Cranmer’s influence on church teaching on penance during the Henrician Reformation. Eric Bramhall

This article examines the reform of the penitential system during the reign of Henry VIII. It considers the call to reform, and analyses official statements from the Ten Articles (1536) to the King’s Book (1543), which is usually regarded as a victory for traditional religion. A careful assessment of the section of the King’s Book on the sacrament of penance, and of the King’s Primer, reveals that in this area evangelical reformers made gains. It shows Cranmer influencing Henry’s religious policy, and as such challenges George Bernard’s position. The article therefore argues for the major significance of penitential reform in the English Reformation.

Lord Kames’s analysis of the natural origins of religion: the Essays on the Principles of Morality and Natural Religion (1751). R. J. W. Mills

This article investigates the discussion of the origins and development of religious belief within the Scottish jurist and philosopher Henry Home, Lord Kames’s Essays on the Principles of Morality and Natural Religion (1751). Kames’s work is argued to be a significant yet understudied contribution to the Scottish Enlightenment’s examination of religion as a human phenomenon. The Principles contained one of the lengthiest analyses on the topic published by a Scottish literatus. In particular, Kames placed into a historical trajectory the internal sense theory’s account of the non-rational origins of religious belief. In doing so, he provided an apologetic account of the progress from polytheism to monotheism resulting from the emergence of civil society, which set the tone for later Scottish discussions of religion.

Please follow and like us:

August issue of Historical Research

by

The Last Chapter

The latest issue of Historical Research (vol. 89, no. 245) now online

Contents:

History and biography. Lawrence Goldman

Bede’s sources for his references to ‘hides’ in the Ecclesiastical History and the History of the Abbots. Richard Shaw

Anne of Kiev (c.1024–c.1075) and a reassessment of maternal power in the minority kingship of Philip I of France. Emily Joan Ward

 Magna Carta and the honour of Wallingford. Christopher Tilley

 The parliamentary mind and the mutable constitution. Catherine Chou

 Recording, reporting and printing the Cromwellian ‘kingship debates’ of 1657. Jonathan Fitzgibbons

 Reformative rhetoric and the exercise of corporal power: Alexander Maconochie’s regime at Birmingham prison, 1849–51. J. M. Moore

 The decline of the Liberal party in the heartland of England: the Liberals in Leicestershire, 1914–24. Gavin J. Freeman

 National Service: the University of London Library during the Second World War. K. E. Attar

 Colonial autonomy and Cold War diplomacy: Hong Kong and the imprisonment of Anthony Grey, 1967–9. James Fellows

 

Please follow and like us:

Pollard Prize 2016 – winners

by

il_570xN.995455364_fq5x

After a very close-run competition, it was decided to award joint first prize to:

Anna Dorofeeva for ‘Miscellanies, Christian reform and early medieval encyclopaedism: a reconsideration of the pre-bestiary Physiologus manuscripts’

[Early Medieval Seminar]

and

Megan Webber for ‘Troubling Agency: Agency and Charity in Early Nineteenth-Century London’

[British History in the Long Eighteenth Century seminar]

 

The Runner-up was

Sam Drake for ‘Since the time of King Arthur: gentry identity and the commonalty of Cornwall c.1300-c.1420’

[Late Medieval seminar]

 

All three papers will be published in Historical Research in due course.

Please follow and like us:

Historical Research – latest articles online

by

JourneyNormandy_Scene3
‘A mission he bore – to Duke William he came’: Harold Godwineson’s Commentum and his covert ambitions. Ad F. J. van Kempen

Harold Godwineson’s journey to France, depicted on the Bayeux Tapestry, is nowadays mostly regarded as rather reckless attempt to free two hostages in Normandy. It is a curious incident, interrupting Harold’s ascent to power in his homeland. William of Malmesbury’s description of it as a fishing party has always been dismissed as a silly explanation. This article connects Malmesbury’s phrase ‘commentum’ (‘pretext’) with other sources on the expedition. This comparison shows that Harold’s boat trip and his intended diplomacy in France were not an interlude in his policy, but formed a continuation of his cautious, calculated manoeuvres towards possession of the English throne.

The English parishes and knights’ fees tax of 1428: a study in fiscal politics and administrationAlex Brayson

This article is the first detailed examination of the English parishes and knights’ fees tax of 1428, based upon parliamentary and exchequer material. It demonstrates that the house of commons insisted upon granting this novel tax, in place of a more financially burdensome fifteenth and tenth, during the financial crisis of 1427–8. The parishes and knights’ fees tax was efficiently administered, notwithstanding some local complications, although its yield was not commensurate with the scale of the crown’s financial needs by the late fourteen-twenties. This provides a unique insight into the origins of the well-documented late Lancastrian fiscal crisis.

This article argues that the church’s strenuous efforts to publicize Magna Carta can only be fully understood when viewed in the context of canon law and pastoral care. The automatic sentence of excommunication that fell on anyone who infringed Magna Carta meant that every Christian in medieval England needed to know not just the general principles of the charter, but the contents of every clause. Clergymen had a duty to ensure that their parishioners did not unwittingly incur the sanction, thereby endangering their souls. Thus the threat of excommunication had a profound effect on the political awareness of English society, as a result of the church’s obligation to look out for the spiritual welfare of its members.

Magna Carta and the honour of Wallingford. Christopher Tilley

Magna Carta mentions the honour of Wallingford twice. Exploring the context of this shows how a tenurial relationship predating John’s accession to the throne led to minor ‘gentry’ landholders experiencing the king’s manipulation of marriages, wardships and escheats directly, and resulted in many serving in John’s military expeditions. All this was in addition to the increasingly onerous demands of royal government also felt by many of their neighbours in the localities. This combination of networks, tenurial and local, helps explain the politicization of minor landholders such as William fitz Ellis of Waterperry, who was present at Runnymede in 1215, and the nature of political society in the early thirteenth century.

Please follow and like us:

New Historical Research article

by

We have to compliment the Aristocracy on the exhibition of their morals’: the Ellenborough divorce case (1830) and the politics of scandal in pre-reform London and Vormärz Vienna by Greet de Bock220px-Stieler-Jane_Digby

Using the 1830 divorce of Lord and Lady Ellenborough as a case study, this article sheds more light on the mechanisms of sexual scandal in early nineteenth-century Europe. It contrasts the publicity and political meaning given to the adultery of Lady Ellenborough and the Austrian envoy Felix zu Schwarzenberg in London and Vienna. Whereas radical and moderate reformers exploited the divorce to contest aristocratic leadership and to propagate a contrasting model of domesticity in the British press, the Austrian government went to great lengths to cover up the affair. Both Austrian diplomatic correspondence and British high-society letters and diaries from before and during the scandal show an awareness of the damage that disclosures about the private affairs of the elite could cause.

Please follow and like us:

Pollard Prize 2016

by

 

The deadline for this year’s prize is Friday 27 May.

 

The Pollard Prize (sponsored by Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.) is awarded for the best paper presented at an IHR seminar 2014-15 by a postgraduate student or by a researcher within one year of completing the PhD.1096214263368_PXYJwtsF_l

First prize

Fast track publication in the prestigious IHR journal, Historical Research, and £200 of Blackwell books.

Runner up prizes

Publication in Historical Research, and a selection of Blackwell books.

Application

Applicants are required to have delivered a paper during the academic year in which the award is made. Submissions should be supported by a reference from a convenor of the appropriate seminar. Papers should be fully footnoted, although it is not necessary at this stage to follow Historical Research house style. All papers submitted must be eligible for publication.

The closing date for submissions is  27 May 2016

Enquiries and submissions should be directed to the Deputy Editor, Historical Research (julie.spraggon@sas.ac.uk).

Please follow and like us:

May issue of Historical Research (vol. 89, no. 244) published

by

300px-Keeling-fire-engine-illustration

Contents

The early Irish hostage surety and inter-territorial alliances by Jaqueline Bemmer

A matter of trust: the royal regulation of England’s French residents during wartime, 1294–1377 by Bart Lambert and W. Mark Ormrod [open access]

Treason, felony and Lollardy: a common petition in the hand of Richard Osbarn, clerk of the chamber of the Guildhall, 1400–c.1437 by Helen Killick

Persuading the queen’s majesty’s subjects from their allegiance: treason, reconciliation and confessional identity in Elizabethan England by Lucy Underwood

The representation and experience of English urban fire disasters, c.1580–1640 by John E. Morgan

Lame Jack his haultings: J. H. Hexter, the ‘middle group’ and William Prynne by Warwick K. George

‘You know I am all on fire’: writing the adulterous affair in England, c.1740–1830 by Sally Holloway [open access]

The end of the ‘dual possession’ of Sakhalin as multilateral diplomacy, 1867–73 by Takahiro Yamamoto

Sometimes somnolent, sometimes seething: British imperial Africa and its home fronts by Bill Nasson

Paper salvage in Britain during the Second World War by Henry Irving

Please follow and like us:

Historical Research virtual issue: Anglo-Irish relations

by

To mark the centenary of the Easter Rising we have put together a collection of previously published articles from Historical Research and podcasts from the IHR research seminar series on the theme of Anglo-Irish relations. This content can be accessed freely for a limited period.

 

247-20141028165313_original[1].

Contents:

A window on mid-Tudor Ireland: the ‘Matters’ against Lord Deputy St. Leger Christopher Maginn

Memories of violence and New English identities in early modern Ireland Joan Redmond

Fashioning victims: Dr. Henry Jones and the plight of Irish Protestants, 1642 Joseph Cope

The establishment of a statutory militia in Ireland, 1692–1716: legislative processes and Protestant mentalities Neal Garnham

‘The true remedy for Irish grievances is to be found in good political institutions’: English radicals and Irish nationalism, 1847–74  Anthony Daly

New Liberalism, J. L. Hammond and the Irish Problem, 1897–1949 G. K. Peatling

‘Abandon Hibernicisation’: priests, Ribbonmen and an Irish street fight in the north-east of England in 1858 Donald M. MacRaild

The army, the press and the ‘Curragh incident’, March 1914 M. L. Connelly

‘The other boys of Kilmichael’: No. 2 Section, ‘C’ Company, Auxiliary Division Royal Irish Constabulary, 28 November 1920 Andrew Nelson

Podcasts

A Sinew of Power? Ireland and the Fiscal-Military State, 1690-1782
Patrick Walsh (British History in the Long 18th Century seminar)

The Murder of Joseph Burke: A Case Study in Conflicting Loyalties in Cork City during the Anglo-Irish Conflict 1919-1922
William Sheehan (Cities and Nationalisms seminar)

Please follow and like us:

< Older Posts