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Events


After the event: Research libraries & research open day

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by Jordan Landes (SHL History Librarian)

Dr James Baker of the British Library spoke about digital research on 18 March.

Dr James Baker of the British Library spoke about digital research on 18 March.

Senate House Library and the Institute of Historical Research Library hosted a well-attended and interesting event aimed at postgraduate students, independent and early career researchers last Tuesday, 18 March. The first morning sessions introduced attendees to archival and library networks and the concepts behind the organisation of collections and information. The later morning sessions covered new skills such as digital research and digital imaging; more established technologies like reference management software and electronic research resources; and always-important topics like training and giving presentations. The afternoon gave attendees the opportunity to directly engage with information professionals from twenty-three libraries, archives and professional information organisations.

 

History Lab and History Lab Plus helped out on the day and recruited new members.

History Lab and History Lab Plus helped out on the day and recruited new members.

Participating libraries, archives and professional associations included: Association of Performing Arts CollectionsBritish Museum LibrariesThe British Postal Museum & ArchiveCaird Library and the National Maritime Museum, Business Archives Council, the archives at the George Padmore InstituteGerman Historical Institute LibraryGuildhall Library, the Institute of Historical ResearchKing’s College London Library ServicesLambeth Palace LibraryLondon Metropolitan ArchivesLibrary of the Society of FriendsLSE Library ServicesThe National Archives, School of Oriental and African Studies LibrarySenate House LibrarySociety of Antiquaries Library and Collections, Special Collections from Goldsmiths University of LondonTUC Collections at London Metropolitan University, Theatre and Performance Collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum, Wellcome Library and the Wiener Library.

Dr Elizabeth Williams talked to students about presentation skills during an afternoon clinic.

Dr Elizabeth Williams talked to students about presentation skills during an afternoon clinic.

If you could not attend, the story of the day is available for you to browse, and Dr James Baker of the British Library posted his notes online. The Institute of Historical Research Library and Senate House Library hope to build on the initial success of this first year and potentially hold History Day annually, reaching out to more students and researchers of history, as well as more repositories. We would like to thank event sponsors, Brepols, Cambridge University Press, Maney Publishing, Polity and Yale University Press, as well as the members of the Committee of London Research Libraries in History, and we hope to see you next time.

Ursula Bloom’s First World War

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In a previous post I mentioned an article which analysed the newspaper reporting of the beginning of the First World War. By happenstance I had begun to read the autobiography of the prolific writer Ursula Bloom – Youth at the Gate – which documents the beginning of the war. The author lived in genteel poverty in St Albans (her mother having left her clergyman father) with her mother and younger brother.

HMS Amphion

HMS Amphion

The family were Daily Mail readers and her opening chapters are smattered with references to that newspaper and the developing international crisis.  The first sign of the war, “… was recorded in the Daily Mail of June 29th, 1914, when it gave details of the assassination … we received the news fairly calmly … a passing shock was overcome by the comforting reassuring, ‘Thank God that sort of thing couldn’t happen here.’” Her family continued their plans for a holiday: the Isle of Wight or Great Yarmouth? The latter was chosen as they were Norfolk people, and it was far cheaper. She charts the rising international tensions through her observations and the Daily Mail. Reading her observations there seems to be a generational split: the older people are concerned and shocked, the younger excited, “If something happened, then it happened, and it would be fun to get us all out of our rut”.

Holiday preparations continued with the packing of trunks. The British fleet left Portland and her mother blamed that, “… awful Mr. Winston Churchill … Somebody ought to stop that silly young man …” Bloom notes the invasion of Luxemburg but is more interested in the advertisements in the Daily Mail for 1st and 2nd August (hotels in Brighton, and the Papier Poudré beauty item).

She worked as a cinema pianist in Harpenden for 30/- a week (3d off for the insurance stamp).  Her working hours were 5.30 to 10.30 and 2.30 to 10.30 on matinees. On bank holidays she began work at 11am. And so it was, in the last few days of peace, she found herself working on the August bank holiday playing any patriotic tune to applause and whistling. Her work in the cinema shows another developing medium, the use of the newsfilm and the use of slides to convey war news. To keep the patrons of the cinema informed about the latest developments and retain the audience, “On the lamp blacked slides latest news was scratched with one of my hairpins, and it was increasingly exciting”. She also relates the newsfilm Pathe Gazette being shown – with pictures of the reserves being called up and a destroyer putting out to see from Harwich – all accompanied by “violent applause from the twopennies”. Later another slide was scratched and displayed saying that Germany still had not replied to the British ultimatum to which the twopennies booed. Goodness knows what the censors would have said if Bloom had continued imparting war news in this manner.

Bloom also recounts how she scratched slides for the siege and fall of Liege (just like the breaking and rolling news of today). Although the cinema owner did not allow the playing of hymns, considering it sacrilege, she played “Through the night of doubt and sorrow” when the slide announcing the city’s fall was shown. Her decision to play the hymn was right as she earned herself a big box of chocolates.

“We were thrilled with the news that HMS Amphion had sunk the German minelayer Königen Luise in British waters. In wild elation I scratched it on the slide, and rushed to the piano, grabbing the keyboard from Mother waiting to greet the announcement with ‘Rule Britannia’. This was the way to win a war! The scanty house rose and cheered to a man!”

The other action that Bloom recorded on the slides was the naval engagement between HMS Amphion and the Königen Luise. The initial slide recorded the sinking of the German ship and then the next day she had to record the loss of Amphion on “my beastly little slides”, as the ship had struck a mine.

Within days of war being declared her fiancé and brother had joined up. Her fiancé then broke off the engagement. The cinema projectionist also enlisted and the commissioner was called up as he was a reservist. Prices shot up and food was hoarded. Her work at the cinema became harder as she had to manage the venue as well as play the piano, all this within the first few weeks of the war. For the rest of the war Bloom fared just as badly. She was accused of being a spy, her mother died of cancer, she witnessed airship raids, and the arrival of casualties. She did marry and had a son. Her army husband survived the war but not the influenza and so, as the war ended, she was left a widow.

Recent articles mirror some of Bloom’s observations about the war.  In History Today there is a piece, The Daily Mail and the First World War, by Adrian Bingham. As well as avid readers of the newspapers, the Bloom family bought the Daily Mail war map for 6d. and pinned it on their wall, though her mother, “… was in a continual dither not knowing where to put the next flag.”  Catriona Pennell has also written an article, Believing the Unbelievable: The Myth of the Russians with ‘Snow on Their Boots’ in the United Kingdom, 1914. Bloom narrates, “Lots of talk going around”, including the rumour of the Cossacks passing though Harpenden station on darkened trains that had been recognized by, “their fur caps and some had the snow of Siberia still on them!”

And finally, the IHR’s Anglo-American conference for 2014 is entitled The Great War at Home which also covers some of the issues raised by Bloom.

 

Call for Papers: London and the First World War (20-21 March 2015)

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Zeppelin over London

As part of events to commemorate the centenary of the First World War, the Centre for Metropolitan History in partnership with IWM (Imperial War Museums) is organising a major conference that will explore the ways in which London and its inhabitants were affected by, and involved with, the 1914-18 conflict.

For the first time London was effectively on the front line, subject to aerial bombing and surveillance, whilst its streets, buildings and spaces were shaped by the needs of mass mobilisation, supply and defence. The war had an impact upon everyday life in the capital in other ways too, including the economy, governance, standards of living, culture, leisure, the physical environment and social life.

The Zeppelin scare is just as if the whole place was in imminent fear of an earthquake. At night the whole of London is in absolute darkness, every window heavily screened, no street lamps, no lamps on vehicles, all trains with windows closed and blinds drawn, constant street accidents and traffic blocks, and a bewildering pandemonium of confusion in the streets.

War Letters of General Monash, Sydney, ed. F.M. Cutlack (1934), p. 124, 18 July 1916; writing to his wife and daughter in Australia

The conference will be an opportunity to examine these and larger themes, such as the idea of ‘resilience’ as a feature of the development of cities in history, and the extent to which warfare has engendered longer term urban societal changes. We are also interested in exploring the ‘legacy’ of the First World War, whether through art, literature, the built environment or the heritage industry.

Proposals for panels (3 x 20 minute papers) or individual papers are invited on any of these or any other topics connected with the impact of the First World War on London, and indeed London’s role, broadly conceived, in the four-year conflict. The programme committee welcomes submissions reflecting a wide range of perspectives and disciplines, including history, geography, literary studies, art history, and museology. We also welcome papers which reflect comparatively on the experiences of London and other cities in the UK and in other countries.

Programme Committee:
Suzanne Bardgett (Imperial War Museums)
Professor Matthew Davies (Centre for Metropolitan History)
Professor Richard Dennis (UCL)
Dr Stefan Goebel (Kent)
Professor Jerry White (Birkbeck, University of London)

Abstracts of c.250 words and a brief biography should be sent by email to: Olwen.Myhill@sas.ac.uk

The deadline for proposals is 30 June 2014.

The conference will be held on Friday 20 March 2015 at the Institute of Historical Research and on Saturday 21 March 2015 at IWM London.

The programme and registration details will be available in September 2014.

Managing your research: from creating to sharing

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shutterstock_120033487To be effective researchers historians must learn skills to enable them to manage their research processes so that everything they do is recoverable, usable, and useful. This workshop is intended to help postgraduate students and early career researchers to think more about what it is they do, to learn about digital tools that can help them become better and more efficient historians, and to recognise the importance of being able to share that research in terms of both the data/research gathered and in terms of publishing.

This workshop looks at various aspects of the research process, providing guidance, ideas, and training in how to be more efficient and better at the research that you do. It is part of the History DMT (data management training) project between the Institute of Historical Research (London); the Department of History (Hull); and the Humanities Research Institute (Sheffield). The workshop is FREE and refreshments, including lunch are available.

To register for the workshop please fill in a booking form on the Institute of Historical Research website.

 A number of bursaries are available to help with travel costs so please indicate if you are interested in one of these in your application. 

Morning

10.30                     Coffee & registration

11.00                     Introduction (Matt Phillpott)

11.15                     Researchers projects – managing their data

11.45                     Bibliographical Tools

12.15                     Practical activity

13.00                     Lunch

Afternoon

14.00                     Sharing Data

14.30                     Open Access

15.00                     Break

15.15                     Practical Activity

16.00                     Conclusion

16.30                     Workshop ends

This is the second of three workshops for the History DMT project. The previous workshop was held in Hull in December (see this previous blog post for full details). The third will be held in Sheffield in April. Each session is intended as a standalone; however, if you attend more than one session we believe that this would be highly beneficial.

Location: Senate House (University of London)

Date: 27 February 2014

Time: 10.30am-4.30pm

Places are limited. To reserve a place please fill in the booking form here. If you would like to learn more about the workshop then please contact Matt Phillpott at matt.phillpott@sas.ac.uk who is happy to help.

Friends Film Evening: The Duchess (2008)

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Penny Corfield  2010The Friends of the IHR will be hosting another of its popular film evenings on 17 February at 5:30.  Professor Penelope Corfield, Professor Emeritus, Royal Holloway, University of London will be presenting the film.

Georgina Cavendish, The Duchess of Devonshire, was an an extremely colourful 18th century British aristocrat.  She was not only a socialite, a fashion icon and a political activist, but was also a fervent gambler with unconventional marital arrangements.

The Duchess (2008) is based on the biography, Georgina Cavendish, Duchess of Devonshire, by Amanda Foreman.  The film featured Keira Knightley as the Duchess and Ralph Fiennes, as her husband, William Cavendish, 5th Duke of Devonshire.  The film won several well deserved awards for Best Costume Design, including an Academy Award and a BAFTA.

Reynolds_-_Portrait_of_Georgia_Spencer,_Duchess_of_Devonshire_Wiki

Professor Corfield, who is an expert on economic, social, cultural, and urban history from the eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries will put the film into historical context.  She will also speak about the film’s costumes and the fashion of the day.

The event is open to the public and tickets are £15/£10 (students).  The talk will start at 5:30, with the screening at 6:00 the film will be followed by a reception at 7:30.  If you are interested in joining, please contact IHR Development (IHR.Development@sas.ac.uk or on 0207 862 8764/91).

Upcoming events at the IHR

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tim-snyder2 (1)Here in the IHR events office, we’re gearing up for a long evening. The IHR is hosting two memorial lectures today: The Holocaust Memorial Lecture, hosted by the Pears Institute at Birkbeck, and the Douglas Johnson Memorial Lecture, which is organised by the Society for the Study of French History.

We’ve hosted these memorial lectures for quite a number of years now, and they have become regular features in our events schedule. We value our collaborative partnerships with UK and international organisations highly – around half of IHR events are co-hosted. These events are a great opportunity to widen our networks and build relationships across history departments across the country and sometimes the world.

GlobalarchiveThe Gerald Aylmer Seminar taking place on 28th February at Senate House is certainly a collaborative event. The seminar, which has taken The Global Archive as its theme, is being co-hosted with The National Archives, the Royal Historical Society, the University of Leicester, and of course, the Institute of Historical Research. The Gerald Alymer Seminar typically co-hosts with a number of organisations, and attracts over a 100 people each year. Such a diverse group of partners means that discussion is almost always progressive and aims to break into new territory.

Stay tuned to hear more about forthcoming IHR events, such as the exciting History after Hobsbawm conference in April, jointly hosted with the history department at Birkbeck as well as BBC: Origins, Influences, Audiences: a 50th anniversary celebration, being held at the Science Museum, London, also in April.

See you at an IHR event soon!

Workshop: Developing online research training and course delivery

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Date: 21 June 2011

Location: Wolfson Room, IHR

Time: 1pm-4pm

In a world where research projects are increasingly based around digital resources and technologies, historians can no longer ignore the potential that Online Research Training can provide for Higher Education teaching and for training of scholars, professionals and students. This workshop examines good practice for online training and reflects on both pedagogical issues and on technological benefits and limitations. In particular it focuses on the development by the IHR of the History SPOT platform (Seminar Podcasts and Online Training) which will soon be released as the Institute’s primary online platform for its Research Seminars and Training courses. The workshop also looks at the Open University’s recent development of an Online MA in History.

Please join us for an afternoon to discuss and debate about the benefits and limitations of online research training and to see behind the scenes on two recent projects that are attempting to expand what we can achieve and expect from digital course delivery.

Cost: Free (please email history.spot@sas.ac.uk to register a place)

See the Workshop webpage for the full programme

Workshop: Developing online research training and course delivery

by

Date: 21 June 2011

Location: Wolfson Room, IHR

Time: 1pm-4pm

In a world where research projects are increasingly based around digital resources and technologies, historians can no longer ignore the potential that Online Research Training can provide for Higher Education teaching and for training of scholars, professionals and students.  This workshop examines good practice for online training and reflects on both pedagogical issues and on technological benefits and limitations.  In particular it focuses on the development by the IHR of the History SPOT platform (Seminar Podcasts and Online Training) which will soon be released as the Institute’s primary online platform for its Research Seminars and Training courses.  The workshop also looks at the Open University’s recent development of an Online MA in History.

Please join us for an afternoon to discuss and debate about the benefits and limitations of online research training and to see behind the scenes on two recent projects that are attempting to expand what we can achieve and expect from digital course delivery.

 
Cost: Free (please email history.spot@sas.ac.uk to register a place)See the Workshop webpage for the full programme

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