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Author Archives: dannymillum


PASSAGE: A symposium on writing about walking in London, 1500-1900

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H1170010The Dr Seng Tee Lee Centre, Senate House Library
October 27th 2015

The University of London’s Senate House Library will be hosting a symposium in connection with a new project to begin later this year being jointly run by the Centre for Metropolitan History at the Institute of Historical Research, Senate House Library and the School of Advanced Study. The Passage project hopes to address a number of research questions arising from historical texts that describe or are structured around walking around London. It’s intended to be very broad in its disciplinary approaches, as well as its period of coverage (from Stow to the early 20th century), and its research themes will be wide ranging, including:

  • The topographical development of London at various periods
  • The associations of place with specific types of activity
  • The associations of place with types of morality
  • The development of consumer services
  • Reasons for and different types of walking around London (‘strolling, striding, marching’)
  • Changes in the literary genre of ‘travel writing’, broadly defined

The body of texts to be examined by the project include tour guides, travel journals of visitors, literary/polemical discourses ‘attached’ to walks, topographical surveys, administrative records (e.g. perambulation accounts), criminal records (e.g. trespass depositions) and governmental (control of walking routes/rights of way, enclosure, management of protest etc.).

The project is still very much in its infancy at the moment – even the project website is yet to be launched! – but the symposium will provide an excellent opportunity for scholars and students from various backgrounds and disciplines to define the landscape. The symposium will fall into two halves: the first half of the day will focus on papers from invited speaks who will be discussing very different approaches to historical writing about walking in London. Speakers include Nick Barratt (SHL) will be talking about walking as recorded in official records, focusing on Medieval London; Sarah Dustagheer (Kent) will be talking about Shakespeare, walking and London; Richard Dennis (UCL) who will be talking about George Gissing, Charles Booth and 19th century walking in London; and Matthew Beaumont (UCL) who will be discussing nightwalking in London.

The second half of the day will include a round-table discussion of the themes that arise from the papers, and will also provide an opportunity to view interesting and rare examples of London walking literature. In the afternoon, Senate House Library’s Rare Books Library, Dr Karen Attar, will be displaying and talking about the Bromhead Library (http://senatehouselibrary.ac.uk/our-collections/special-collections/printed-special-collections/bromhead-library/), a collection from which many of works on walking come, as well as items from other collections that will be providing evidence throughout the Passage project.

The symposium is free but places are strictly limited. If you would like to attend please register in advance via Eventbrite at: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/passage-a-symposium-on-writing-about-walking-in-london-1500-1900-tickets-17828962908.

IHR research guides give hands-on support to students and researchers

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Griffith-EscapeEditedThis post was originally published on the Talking Humanities blog of the School of Advanced Study

The Institute of Historical Research (IHR) has just published Using Film as a Source, the first in a new series of research guides designed to equip students and new researchers with the information they need to tackle a particular field.

Written by Sian Barber a lecturer in film studies at Queen’s University, Belfast, the guide’s 192 pages explore how film and moving image can be used as historical sources. It will be a model for future publications in this planned series that is expected to cover a diverse range of topics including space, transport history, material culture and objects and Tudor government.

Naturally each author will approach writing the guides in different ways, according to the demands of their subjects. In Dr Barber’s case, she treats using film as historical evidence as if it has its own conventions and practice. Detailed case studies are employed as an aid to beginning researchers in the field. The guide includes sections on working with different kinds of moving images, how to explore visual sources, how to undertake film-related research and how to use film theory, as well as providing a full bibliography, glossary and resource list. And Dr Barber also addresses a subject that is perhaps little considered by non-specialists: how exactly do you cite a film in academic work?

Our plan is that the main content of each guide will follow roughly the same structure: Understanding the historiographical context; Formulating your research questions; Choosing your methodology; Locating your sources; Getting the best from your library (negotiating archives, digital resources); Using your sources (handling and reading sources, reproducing images); Writing up your findings; What next?

Therefore, although the IHR Research Guides will place the subject in historiographical context, they will be largely practical in focus. And as increasingly necessary, there will also be good coverage of digital resources for a particular topic.

As such, they will be particularly useful for final-year undergraduates and beginning postgraduates, as well as independent researchers. Printed only in paperbacks, they should be affordable by individuals and not just by libraries.

Jonathan Blaney is a project editor for IHR Digital and one of the series editors for the IHR Research Guides series.

Reviews in History fashion special IV

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fashion2We end our monthly fashion special with Bethan Bide’s assessment of the Fashion on the Ration exhibition at the Imperial War Museum, and she reports on a thoughtful exhibition which could be bolder in using material culture evidence to signpost the counter narratives contained within the objects on display (no. 1803).

Next up is Textiles, Fashion and Design Reform in Austria-Hungary Before the First World War by Rebecca Houze. Shona Kallestrup believes this book provokes a welcome reconsideration of how we understand the complex cultural tapestry of Vienna (no. 1802).

Finally for fashion, we  turn to Fashionable Queens: Body – Power – Gender, edited by Eva Flicker and Monika Seidl, with Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell warning against a muddled mixed bag of an essay collection (no. 1801).

We also have a great review of the newly enhanced Welsh Newspapers Online website, as Paul O’Leary reviews a formidable resource with enormous potential for the study of the 19th and early 20th centuries (no. 1800).

Study for a one-year Masters in History at the Institute of Historical Research

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senate_house_uolIf you are currently looking to enrol on a Masters course in History which begins this autumn, 2015, whether full or part-time, then the IHR has just the course for you: our Masters in Historical Research.

Taught by acknowledged specialists, taken successfully by recent students, this is an ideal course for learning essential skills required by historians today. These are also skills in the manipulation and analysis of data which are transferable to business and the professions.

Whether you have graduated this summer in History and want to stay on for more, or took a degree some years ago, whether in History or a related subject, the IHR’s Masters in Historical Research may be right for you.

PLACES AVAILABLE FOR START IN SEPTEMBER 2015.

APPLY HERE AND NOW

Reviews in History fashion special III

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paulicelli2Our fashion special continues this week, beginning with Writing Fashion in Early Modern Italy: From Sprezzatura to Satire by Eugenia Paulicelli. Cordelia Warr tackles a book which is part of an ongoing endeavour to bring together different disciplines to investigate dress and fashion (no. 1799).

Next up is Denise Rall’s edited collection Fashion and War in Popular Culture, which Rebecca Arnold finds to be an ambitious book, but one whose scope could have been defined with more clarity (no. 1798).

Then we have Dress Casual: How College Students Redefined American Style by Deidre Clemente. John Potvin recommends a serious and genuine contribution to the history of American fashion and cultural life (no. 1797).

Finally we turn to Kate Haulman’s The Politics of Fashion in Eighteenth-Century America, which  Gaye Wilson believes offers a fresh and thought-provoking encounter with early American history (no. 1796).

Reviews in History fashion special II

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norberg2We continue this week with our fashion special, and first up this week is Fashion Prints in the Age of Louis XIV: Interpreting the Art of Elegance, edited by Kathryn Norberg. David Pullins hopes the essays here will prompt more sustained engagement with this important genre of print (no. 1795).

Then we turn to Joy Spanabel Emery’s A History of the Paper Pattern Industry: The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution, as Valerie Cumming recommends a carefully organised book on American and English language patterns from the 1840s up to the present day (no. 1794).

Next up is Kristi Upson-Saia, Carly Daniel-Hughes and Alicia J. Batten’s Dressing Judeans and Christians in Antiquity. Mary Harlow reviews a volume which shows that dress can be a medium for talking about so much more than dress (no. 1793).

We also  have Spanish Fashion at the Courts of Early Modern Europe, edited by José Luis Colomer and Amalia Descalzo. Tara Zanardi believes this anthology should propel future study in the history of Spanish dress of the early modern period and invigorate the field of fashion history (no. 1792).

Finally, there’s a non-fashion review that reviewer Stan Nadel has been waiting patiently for me to publish – his take on Jews and the Left: The Rise and Fall of a Political Alliance by Philip Mendes is no. 1791.

 

Reviews in History fashion special

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Houndsditch1862x30Today is the first day of Fashion, the 84th Anglo-American Conference of Historians, and as usual, this means we’ll be publishing a series of fashion-related reviews over the next few weeks. We start this week with a book by one of the session chairs from the conference, Vivienne Richmond, Clothing the Poor in Nineteenth-Century England. Sally Tuckett recommends a volume which ensures that the dress of the historical majority is seen as being just as worthy of attention and analysis as that of the fashionable elite (no. 1790).

Next up is From Main Street to Mall: The Rise and Fall of the American Department Store by Vicki Howard, as Jan Whitaker looks at a new history of an American retail institution (no. 1789).

Then we turn to Tansy Hoskins’ Stitched Up: The Anti-Capitalist Book of Fashion. Esther Leslie reviews a book which suggests that the fashion industry is deadly, and that its seductions are lethal (no. 1788).

Finally we have Kimono: A Modern History by Terry Satsuki Milhaupt. Elizabeth Kramer believes this book persuasively challenges the myth of the kimono as a traditional, static garment (no. 1787).

New reviews: Eleanor of Aquitaine, American Jews, Cold War intelligence and the French Revolution

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1024px-Church_of_Fontevraud_Abbey_Eleanor_of_Aquitaine_effigyWe start with Michael R. Evans’ Inventing Eleanor: the Medieval and Post-Medieval Image of Eleanor of Aquitaine, which Elena Woodacre thinks has much to offer both the historian and the interested public (no. 1786).

Then we turn to Transnational Traditions: New Perspectives on American Jewish History, edited by Ava F. Kahn, Adam D. Mendelsohn. Toni Pitock believes this book will reorient our thinking about American Jewish history in particular, and Jewish history in general (no. 1785).

Next up is Huw Dylan’s Defence Intelligence and the Cold War: Britain’s Joint Intelligence Bureau 1945-1964. Rory Cormac recommends an impeccably researched and well-written work (no. 1784).

Finally we have a review article by Dave Andress covering Stuff and Money in the Time of the French Revolution by Rebecca Spang and The Coming of the Terror in the French Revolution by Timothy Tackett, which includes responses from both authors (no. 1783, with response here).

Fashion and consumption in the First World War: Department store catalogues 1916-17

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AboutPeterRobinsonThe Institute of Historical Research, in collaboration with Senate House Library, is delighted to announce the launch of a new online exhibition of digitised fashion catalogues from the First World War. These select catalogues of women’s clothing from 1916 and 1917 illustrate the war’s impact on materials, the roles of women and fashion itself.

 

BradleysStewartandMacdonaldThe exhibition is freely available at http://www.history.ac.uk/exhibitions/fashion/index.html, and includes eight fully digitised catalogues from five different department stores (Bradleys, Dickins and Jones, Peter Robinson, John Barnes and Stewart and Macdonald), potted histories of each of these, and further articles on the provenance of the catalogues, their preservation and the process involved in scanning them.

 

JohnBarnes2Scanning2This online exhibition is the result of a collaboration between the Institute of Historical Research’s IHR Digital Department and Senate House Library, and has been produced thanks to contributions from Angela Craft, Dr Richard Espley, Dave Jackson, Dr Jordan Landes, Danny Millum and Professor Jane Winters. Please do get in touch with danny.millum@sas.ac.uk with any questions or feedback.

New reviews – public sector unions, Frederick Douglass, Islamic Empire, war resisters

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disalvo2We start with Government Against Itself: Public Sector Union Power and Its Consequences by Daniel DiSalvo. Joseph E. Hower and the author discuss a useful book on an important subject (no. 1782, with response here).

Next up is Laurence Fenton’s Frederick Douglass in Ireland: The Black O’Connell, and Hannah-Rose Murray recommends a well-written and researched volume (no. 1781).

Then we turn to Robert Hoyland’s In God’s Path: The Arab Conquests and the Creation of an Islamic Empire. Youssef Choueiri reviews a lively and fresh account of the Arab conquests (no. 1780).

Finally, Cyril Pearce provides a monumental overview of the literature on war resisters over the last 100 years, in Writing about Britain’s 1914-18 War Resisters (no. 1779).