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New reviews: French in London, employees, the Irish Question and food supply

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cornickI’m always receptive to feedback (this is the sort of foolish statement that unleashes a barrage of abuse and ends with me weeping in a corner), and as a sharp-eyed reader had pointed out a couple of weeks ago that all the reviews we’d published that week had (co-incidentally) been on British history, I just wondered whether anyone else had suggestions for areas we don’t cover as much as we ought? Don’t think I won’t notice if it turns out that the gaps in our coverage can only really be filled by reviews of your own forthcoming masterpieces…

Do get in touch at danny.millum@sas.ac.uk.

Anyway, on with the reviews, and our featured book this week is A History of the French in London: Liberty, Equality, Opportunity, edited by Martyn Cornick and Debra Kelly. Antoine Capet believes this new collection would make an ideal gift for a member of the age-old ‘French Colony’ in London (no. 1574).

VinelThen we turn to Jean-Christian Vinel’s The Employee: A Political History, which Jefferson Cowie believes invigorates the stale paradigms of labor history and brings new perspectives and intellectual energy to the subject (no. 1573).

simNext up is A Union Forever: The Irish Question and U.S. Foreign Relations in the Victorian Age by David Sim. Andre Fleche and the author discuss a work which will prove essential to understanding how American statesmen dealt with the complex problems raised by the ‘Irish question’ (no. 1572, with response here).

thoenFinally James Davis believes  Food Supply, Demand and Trade: Aspects of the Economic Relationship between Town and Countryside (eds. Piet van Cruijningen, Erik Thoen) adds to the important debates on pre-industrial town-country relations and provides much food for thought (no. 1571).